Waiting on Wednesday

waiting on wednesday

Every week Breaking the Spine hosts the bookish meme for book bloggers to share what books they are waiting on to be released!  This week I’m waiting on:

Release Date: June 27, 2017

Lada Dracul has no allies. No throne. All she has is what she’s always had: herself. After failing to secure the Wallachian throne, Lada is out to punish anyone who dares to cross her blood-strewn path. Filled with a white-hot rage, she storms the countryside with her men, accompanied by her childhood friend Bogdan, terrorizing the land. But brute force isn’t getting Lada what she wants. And thinking of Mehmed brings little comfort to her thorny heart. There’s no time to wonder whether he still thinks about her, even loves her. She left him before he could leave her.

What Lada needs is her younger brother Radu’s subtlety and skill. But Mehmed has sent him to Constantinople—and it’s no diplomatic mission. Mehmed wants control of the city, and Radu has earned an unwanted place as a double-crossing spy behind enemy lines. Radu longs for his sister’s fierce confidence—but for the first time in his life, he rejects her unexpected plea for help. Torn between loyalties to faith, to the Ottomans, and to Mehmed, he knows he owes Lada nothing. If she dies, he could never forgive himself—but if he fails in Constantinople, will Mehmed ever forgive him?

As nations fall around them, the Dracul siblings must decide: what will they sacrifice to fulfill their destinies? Empires will topple, thrones will be won . . . and souls will be lost.

 

 

Waiting on Wednesday

waiting on wednesday

Every week Breaking the Spine hosts the bookish meme for book bloggers to share what books they are waiting on to be released!  This week I’m waiting on:

Release Date: June 6, 2017

Louna, daughter of famed wedding planner Natalie Barrett, has seen every sort of wedding: on the beach, at historic mansions, in fancy hotels and clubs. Perhaps that’s why she’s cynical about happily-ever-after endings, especially since her own first love ended tragically.

When Louna meets charming, happy-go-lucky serial dater Ambrose, she holds him at arm’s length. But Ambrose isn’t about to be discouraged, now that he’s met the one girl he really wants.

Blog Tour: Q & A with Carrie Mac

Welcome to the Midsummer Reads day on the 10 Things I Can See From Here Blog Tour!

I had the pleasure of interviewing the lovely Carrie Mac about her new book and about some of the content!

You can keep an eye our for review of 10 Things I Can See From Here, coming soon!

Interview Key: Italics= Midsummer, Bold = Carrie Mac

  1. Carrie, as someone who struggles with anxiety, it is so great to read a book that depicts the spiraling thoughts that come along with it.  Did you do a lot of research to show this accurately?

Anxiety is a very unwelcome houseguest in my own imagination.

It’s always there, and even when I kindly—or very unkindly—suggest that it’s time to go, it hangs around. Sometimes when I’ve tried to get rid of it, it hides and I think it’s finally gone, but then it burns a piece of toast in the kitchen and starts a small fire and before you know it there are sirens and then the fire trucks are outside and the house has burnt down. Or no, wait, it hasn’t. Just the smoke alarm went off.

That little shit Anxiety never left. It just hid in a closet until I was finally calming down. Oh, I know Anxiety well. I don’t like it, but we are close.

Same for a couple other dear members of my family, so it was all too easy to write. And all too easy to give to Maeve.

Sorry Maeve. Love you, hon.

 

2. What was your thought process of not having Maeve attend therapy while staying with her family in Canada?

There are a couple of reasons.

As much as Maeve’s dad and stepmom are on board with whatever Deena wants to do to support Maeve, they have their own ideas and beliefs about mental health and truth be told, they’re not that into formal supports, if at all avoidable. Maeve’s dad doesn’t give much thought to any particular ‘approach’ to Maeve’s mental health at all, other than to love her for who she is and support in any given moment to calm down or take it easy or change the subject. Claire is big into anything supporting Maeve’s mental health, but only if it rings as true and helpful. Claire—having experience with it herself — is not that into talk therapy, so that’s not something she wouldn’t leap at. But hikes and sleep and diet and homeopathy? Knitting? You bet!

Now that things have settled down, Maeve will sort herself out and find a therapist. Unless she’s going to use the six months to try other things.

Not knitting though.

Or marimba lessons.

 

3. I think I’ve only read one or two books that were explicit about being based in Canada! It was so nice to read about Vancouver. Since you live in Canada was this a natural choice, or was it a secret plot to make us all want to visit? (But seriously, I want to go to Vancouver now.) 

            This story lives in East Van. I’m sitting in my usual coffee shop writing now, looking out on the neighborhood where Maeve’s parents live. Most of my novels don’t need to be set anywhere in particular, but Maeve’s story is an East Vancouver story. This neighborhood is special, and it is exactly what I needed for Maeve. Her community needed to be healthy and vibrant and supportive and delightfully weird because she was already dealing with her anxiety and a very real mess at home, and then the added flurry that comes with falling in love. This neighborhood is an anchor in the book.

Absolutely come visit! This is a charmed city in so many ways, even if our dark underbelly can be exceptionally dark at times.

 

4. On your Twitter you mentioned that the bus beheading was a real story that inspired one of Maeve’s spirals, are the others she references real as well? 

Most of them are, yes. To name a few, the bus beheading, the women taken from the Downtown Eastside and murdered at a pig farm, the young women shot by a gunman while at college, the man who drove off the ferry dock, bedbug infestations, the suicide pact, cholera, the woman driving the ‘school bus’ van, and then others are more general, like someone jumping in front of a train, earthquakes (very real threat here), or being kidnapped from a city park. Real or not, though, I bent each one to make it fit. Like Emily Dickinson wrote, “Tell all the truth, but tell it slant.”

 5. Speaking of, how much of your research for this novel was on disastrous statistics? 

            I only dipped into actual statistics when absolutely necessary because they freak me out. So much that I’m getting anxious just answering this question. Maeve needs facts. They both fuel her anxiety and set limits to it, so I researched for her. If it were up to me, I’d never ever look that shit up.

Now, what are ten things I can see from here …?

 

6. What is the most exciting thing about having 10 Things I Can See From Here being published with such a large advertising campaign? I swear most bloggers I talk to have either read your book or have had it pre-ordered for a long time! 

            I love actually seeing it everywhere. The cover just pops right out of websites and news releases and tweets sings “Hi! Look at me! I am so beautiful and you should read me and we will be such good friends!” And when I see the book pop up I think, “Oh! There’s my super famous friend!” and then I remember that 10 Things is my baby. It’s really exciting. I can’t wait for everyone to read it. And I cannot wait for people to send selfies of them reading it all over the place, with that gorgeous cover doing a song and dance on a dreary subway train or a dark bedroom on a rainy day.

 

7. What advice do you have to young writers who struggle to sit down and finish a story?

            Write all the way to the end. Don’t look back. Don’t re-read, don’t revise, don’t do spellcheck, just keep going all the way to the end. That’s when you can start to be precious about it. Wait until you have a first draft, and then you can worry, and revise, and change things around.

First drafts suck.

They should.

Write the damn thing, and then you get to move on to the second draft, which is so much better.

Don’t believe in writers’ block. It’s a myth. It doesn’t exist. Just because you can’t write the thing you want to write doesn’t mean you can’t work on something else.

Write.

Just write.

Imagine if you wrote only one single page a day, you’d have a 365-page novel at the end of the year.

Yay, you!

 

8. If you had to say one thing to a young reader after they read 10 Things I Can See From Here, what would you say? 

“What did you think of it?”

And then we’d get to talking because of their answer. Maybe they want to talk about Maeve, and how they identified with her anxiety, or maybe they loved how being queer was no big deal because it’s a huge taboo in their community. Or maybe they want to critique me on the book, because they’re a writer and would’ve done it differently.

I don’t have any one thing to say, but I would love to hear what readers have to say.

 

 

Thanks so much to Carrie Mac for stopping by A Midsummer Night’s Read!  You can pick up 10 Things I Can See From Here now!

 

 

 

Waiting on Wednesday

waiting on wednesday

Every week Breaking the Spine hosts the bookish meme for book bloggers to share what books they are waiting on to be released!  This week I’m waiting on:

Release Date: May 30, 2017

Pay close attention and you might solve this.

On Monday afternoon, five students at Bayview High walk into detention.
    Bronwyn, the brain, is Yale-bound and never breaks a rule.
    Addy, the beauty, is the picture-perfect homecoming princess.
    Nate, the criminal, is already on probation for dealing.
    Cooper, the athlete, is the all-star baseball pitcher.
    And Simon, the outcast, is the creator of Bayview High’s notorious gossip app.
 
Only, Simon never makes it out of that classroom. Before the end of detention Simon’s dead. And according to investigators, his death wasn’t an accident. On Monday, he died. But on Tuesday, he’d planned to post juicy reveals about all four of his high-profile classmates, which makes all four of them suspects in his murder. Or are they the perfect patsies for a killer who’s still on the loose?
 
Everyone has secrets, right? What really matters is how far you would go to protect them.

Waiting on Wednesday

waiting on wednesday

 

Every week Breaking the Spine hosts the bookish meme for book bloggers to share what books they are waiting on to be released!  This week I’m waiting on:

Release Date: March 7, 2017

When Julia finds a slur about her best friend scrawled across the back of the Kingston School for the Deaf, she covers it up with a beautiful (albeit illegal) graffiti mural.

Her supposed best friend snitches, the principal expels her, and her two mothers set Julia up with a one-way ticket to a “mainstream” school in the suburbs, where she’s treated like an outcast as the only deaf student. The last thing she has left is her art, and not even Banksy himself could convince her to give that up.

Out in the ’burbs, Julia paints anywhere she can, eager to claim some turf of her own. But Julia soon learns that she might not be the only vandal in town. Someone is adding to her tags, making them better, showing off—and showing Julia up in the process. She expected her art might get painted over by cops. But she never imagined getting dragged into a full-blown graffiti war.

 

 

Book Review: Gemina by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff

Moving to a space station at the edge of the galaxy was always going to be the death of Hanna’s social life. Nobody said it might actually get her killed.

The sci-fi saga that began with the breakout bestseller Illuminaecontinues on board the Jump Station Heimdall, where two new characters will confront the next wave of the BeiTech assault.

Hanna is the station captain’s pampered daughter; Nik the reluctant member of a notorious crime family. But while the pair are struggling with the realities of life aboard the galaxy’s most boring space station, little do they know that Kady Grant and the Hypatia are headed right toward Heimdall, carrying news of the Kerenza invasion.

When an elite BeiTech strike team invades the station, Hanna and Nik are thrown together to defend their home. But alien predators are picking off the station residents one by one, and a malfunction in the station’s wormhole means the space-time continuum might be ripped in two before dinner. Soon Hanna and Nik aren’t just fighting for their own survival; the fate of everyone on the Hypatia—and possibly the known universe—is in their hands.

But relax. They’ve totally got this. They hope.

So, I’m not going to lie to you: I liked Gemina soooooo much more than I liked Illuminae.  Not that Illuminae was bad, but I think that I really identified more with the Captain’s daughter with a naughty streak and her attraction to the bad boy with a golden heart. Hanna is sarcastic, a bit rebellious, maybe a little callus, but it masks her soft spots for her father and for her boyfriend.  Plus, what is more bad ass than a girl who has utilized her stranding on a remote waystation in space to get extremely strong and fast in a dojo?

Really, I mostly am just a giant Hanna fan, because she seems to continually prove to herself that she can do whatever she needs to survive in this situation.  Plus, when she doesn’t understand something scientifically, she just accepts that something needs to be done and gets it DONE. Nik, on the other hand, I was prepared to dislike a bit, if only because he was set up to seem like a guy who tried to hard. So it took a while for me to really grow to like him as a character.  Basically it was the scene with the cow that sold him to me.  I won’t spoil that for you, but you definitely should check that out.

Is it a stereotypical love connection? Probably.  BUT, the circumstances of everything that happens within this world is what makes it so much more fun to read.

Exactly like Illuminae, the story of Hanna and Nik is told through the style of dossiers, a case file that has redacted statements, etc.  However, I think that part of the reason I did enjoy this one more was the inclusion of hand drawn illustrations, which were provided by Marie Lu, and the ever growing bloodstain on the pages.

I think that one reason I’m really drawn to this series, and one that I’ll use as a suggestion for those looking for a Holiday gift for a Doctor Who fan, is that I really connected with these books on a Whovian level.

While neither are exact replicas of storylines on Who, both remind me of very specific episodes (See my Illuminae review for the episode comparison for that book).  Gemina is almost the story of Pete’s World or Doomsday from Season 2 of the new series with Rose and the Tenth Doctor.  *SPOILER ALERT* There are duplicate outcomes with different circumstances and in two different realities.  Death plays a role in both those episodes and the novel, and I really admire the scientific research that Kaufman and Kristoff did for the book to make it…easier to understand than it would have been normally.

I’m giving this one 4.5 Bards and recommend it as a Christmas gift!

Waiting on Wednesday

waiting on wednesday

Every week Breaking the Spine hosts the bookish meme for book bloggers to share what books they are waiting on to be released!  This week I’m waiting on:

30269126

Release Date: February 7, 2017

Empress
Rhee, better known as Crown Princess Rhiannon Ta’an, is the sole surviving heir to a powerful dynasty. She’ll stop at nothing to avenge her family and claim her throne.

Fugitive
Aly has risen above his war refugee origins to find fame as the dashing star of a holo-vision show. But when he’s falsely accused of killing Rhee, he’s forced to prove his innocence to save his reputation – and his life.

Madman
With planets on the brink of war, Rhee and Aly are thrown together to confront a ruthless evil that threatens the fate of the entire galaxy.

 

 

 

Book Review: Illuminae by Amie Kaufman and Jay Kristoff

This morning, Kady thought breaking up with Ezra was the hardest thing she’d have to do.

This afternoon, her planet was invaded.

The year is 2575, and two rival megacorporations are at war over a planet that’s little more than an ice-covered speck at the edge of the universe. Too bad nobody thought to warn the people living on it. With enemy fire raining down on them, Kady and Ezra—who are barely even talking to each other—are forced to fight their way onto an evacuating fleet, with an enemy warship in hot pursuit.

But their problems are just getting started. A deadly plague has broken out and is mutating, with terrifying results; the fleet’s AI, which should be protecting them, may actually be their enemy; and nobody in charge will say what’s really going on. As Kady hacks into a tangled web of data to find the truth, it’s clear only one person can help her bring it all to light: the ex-boyfriend she swore she’d never speak to again.

This book.

I don’t even know where to start.

I guess I’ll start with the formatting.

I’ve never read a book that is formatted the way this one is.  In all honesty, when I received the Advanced Reading Copy last year, I was so excited to read it until I opened it.  I saw that it was done in a series of redacted documents, instant message conversations, made up memos, etc, and I just put it aside and didn’t pick it up again until a few weeks before the release of the second installment.

Boy, do I regret the decision to put off reading this for so long.

Not only did the formatting only make the novel more exquisite as what I predict will become a novel to be taught in college young adult/adolescent literature courses, but also as an example in creative writing and how the standard novel format doesn’t necessarily have to be followed in order to tell an in depth story within it’s own story world. In fact, I’ve convinced a Graduate School friend of mine to possibly teach this novel to her class this upcoming Spring, and I really hope it inspires a whole generation of writers that want to do something outside of the box.

So, the love story seemed a bit extra to me in this story.  Honestly, they could have just made Kady, this super strong protagonist with all of these talents with the computer and her intelligence and I would have been a happy girl.  Ezra just kind of felt like a plot device to make the story more sellable to young adult readers.  Which isn’t a problem, I just think he was an extraneous part of the story.

AIDEN, on the other hand, was a more fruitful character than Ezra at every turn. Never have I ever thought that I could enjoy a computer generated and moderated program as much as AIDEN.  Sure, it has it’s faults and it isn’t exactly an ideal companion in a lot of ways, but it genuinely develops a rapport with Kady and *SPOILER ALERT* saves her life!

Now, I think that any reader that enjoyed Illuminae and is thinking about gifting it to someone who hasn’t read it yet should consider all of their Whovian friends.  Illuminae reminds me of one of my absolute favorite David Tennant episodes, The Waters of Mars.  Now, in most obvious ways it involves a disease that spreads easily and quickly throughout the crew and poses a great threat to those who haven’t been involved yet.  However, I think the part that reminds me the most of it is at the end, when the Doctor (AIDEN, people!!!) thinks that he is doing the right thing by saving those who may not have meant to be saved.

Either way, this book is one that should be gifted and discussed, for sure.

4 Bards

 

Waiting on Wednesday

waiting on wednesday

Every week Breaking the Spine hosts the bookish meme for book bloggers to share what books they are waiting on to be released!  This week I’m waiting on:

30011014

Release Date: January 10, 2017

Marinda has kissed dozens of boys. They all die afterward. It s a miserable life, but being a visha kanya a poison maiden is what she was created to do. Marinda serves the Raja by dispatching his enemies with only her lips as a weapon.

Until now, the men she was ordered to kiss have been strangers, enemies of the kingdom. Then she receives orders to kiss Deven, a boy she knows too well to be convinced he needs to die. She begins to question who she s really working for. And that is a thread that, once pulled, will unravel more than she can afford to lose.

 

 

Book Review: How to be You by Jeffrey Marsh

An interactive experience, How to Be You invites you to make the book your own through activities such as coloring in charts, answering questions about how you do the things you do, and discovering patterns in your lives that may be holding you back. Through Jeffrey’s own story of “growing up fabulous in a small farming town”–along with the stories of hero/ines who have transcended the stereotypes of race, age, and gender–you will discover that you are not alone, can deepen your relationship with yourself, and find the courage to take a leap that will change your life.

So, first things first, if you haven’t heard of Jeffrey Marsh, please go check out their vines! I’ve been following them for a while now, and they’re always so inspirational. I was so excited when they announced their book.

I wish that I had actually read the full description and known that it was interactive ahead of time. As it is, I didn’t have time to sit down and actually interact with this book. But the beauty of this book, is that I can come back to it again and again and I can do the exercises every time I read it with different results.

This book is so great for anyone of any age. Even those of us who think we have it figured out. (Spoiler: we don’t.) Jeffrey Marsh does a great job of relating the their ideas of loving and being yourself to all people. The struggle of trying to find yourself is universal and they not only tell us you don’t have to “find yourself” but they also tell us the best ways to stop trying to find yourself and stop trying to fit into other people’s expectations of you. The best piece of advice in all of this, though, is that you can congratulate yourself just for trying. The goal is not to “complete” something, the goal is a journey of learning. And that journey doesn’t stop.

My favorite parts of the book are the Hero/ine segments. They talk about pioneers of equality throughout history and just people they regard as a hero/ine (including my future wife, Wonder Woman). The segments show that people are much happier just being themselves, even when it’s hard. He emphasizes that you shouldn’t try to BE those people, but rather use them as an example to be YOU.

A quick read (without the interactive parts) and really fun and inspirational. 4.5 bards.
four.fivebards

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