Midsummer Meets Marie Lu

Book Review: Daughter of the Pirate King by Tricia Levenseller

There will be plenty of time for me to beat him soundly once I’ve gotten what I came for.
Sent on a mission to retrieve an ancient hidden map—the key to a legendary treasure trove—seventeen-year-old pirate captain Alosa deliberately allows herself to be captured by her enemies, giving her the perfect opportunity to search their ship.
More than a match for the ruthless pirate crew, Alosa has only one thing standing between her and the map: her captor, the unexpectedly clever and unfairly attractive first mate, Riden. But not to worry, for Alosa has a few tricks up her sleeve, and no lone pirate can stop the Daughter of the Pirate King. 

This book. This dang book. I was in a slump before i started this and in all honesty this just made my slump worse because of how good it was. Here is why i loved it so much:

  • I originally didn’t want to get this book because i was holding out hoping for an audio book version(there is one now, get it here). In the end my friend and i both got discount cards for going to a book signing. We were only there for the day so we both ended up getting a book. I picked out this one. I really lucked out because it is a signed copy! I’m super happy i didn’t get the audio book because the way the I visualize the characters is nothing like how it is done in the audio book(this isn’t bad but some days i have to read books and others i have to listen to them. Nothing wrong with doing either.)
  • I’ve seen all of the Pirate’s of the Caribbean movies(spoiler alert, The last one was so anticlimactic. Please just let this series be over.) but this book puts every single one of those movies to shame.  
  • The book is so vibrant and action packed. I loved the adventure. I loved how it sucked me in and i did not want to finish it because of what the world looked like in my mind’s eye. I loved the world building.  I loved how the main character was a feminist and knew that woman were priceless assets to her crew.  I really loved this book.
  • Whenever i’m in the water(specifically the ocean) i finally feel at home.  I feel a sense of peace wash over me. I feel safe. I feel like the she is protecting me. Like she wants to keep me safe.  There is a passage in this book that resonated with me when it comes to my feels about this ocean/sea. It is:

“Even a man who’s spent his whole life at sea has reason to fear her when she’s angry.  But not I. I sleep soundly. Listening to her music. The sea watches over me.  She protects her own.“ Chapter 4

  • Recently i have been having a very hard time with my mental illness and managing it. Ms. Tricia Levenseller wrote a line that when i read it i had to stop reading because i was going to start crying. 

“Everyone has something dark in their past.  I suppose it’s our job to overcome it. And if we can’t overcome it, then all we can do is make the best of it.” Chapter 5

  • Alsoa overcomes so many obstacles in it. She is a very strong heroine.  The more we learn about her, how she thinks, how she acts, how she simply plays the game of life.  She made me want to be strong.

Anyone who wants a strong heroine and who can hold up her own in a fight should pick this book up ASAP.  I can not wait for the sequel to come out in 2018.

This book is in my top five favorite new released for 2017. 5 Bards

Book Review: Warcross by Marie Lu

For the millions who log in every day, Warcross isn’t just a game—it’s a way of life. The obsession started ten years ago and its fan base now spans the globe, some eager to escape from reality and others hoping to make a profit. Struggling to make ends meet, teenage hacker Emika Chen works as a bounty hunter, tracking down players who bet on the game illegally. But the bounty hunting world is a competitive one, and survival has not been easy. Needing to make some quick cash, Emika takes a risk and hacks into the opening game of the international Warcross Championships—only to accidentally glitch herself into the action and become an overnight sensation.

Convinced she’s going to be arrested, Emika is shocked when instead she gets a call from the game’s creator, the elusive young billionaire Hideo Tanaka, with an irresistible offer. He needs a spy on the inside of this year’s tournament in order to uncover a security problem . . . and he wants Emika for the job. With no time to lose, Emika’s whisked off to Tokyo and thrust into a world of fame and fortune that she’s only dreamed of. But soon her investigation uncovers a sinister plot, with major consequences for the entire Warcross empire. 

Truth time: I’ve only read the Legend series by Marie Lu and I am now kicking myself in the ass for not reading my copies of The Young Elites before now because holy hell Warcross kept me on my toes and was absolutely wonderful.

It has everything a modern reader could want: advanced technology, a love story, rags to riches narrative, an intricate game, and so much more.

This book was addicting!

Emika is a seriously relatable character. I found myself completely invested in her narrative, the struggle she had from her parental background and her monetary problems. (Let’s be honest, what millennial wouldn’t relate to that?) Her intense love for art in all forms, her hair, her father’s, and the graphics of Warcross was so believable and it made Emika truly breathe off of the page.

I was completely engrossed in this story from start to finish.

Lu picks up with a chase for a criminal and then snowballs into a hacker being given all she ever dreamed of…but it comes with a price.

I think the only thing I wish had been elaborated on further was the friendships created within the Phoenix Riders.  Why? Well, I just wish I could have spent more time with these characters that Lu created. I know that they should be back for the sequel and I can only hope we get more of their development as well. Although I know the narrative for Warcross was so fast paced (and it needed to be) that some of this development had to be sacrificed, I just wish there was more!

On Twitter there were people complaining about one of the twists in the novel and I have to say that I whole heartedly disagree with their feedback on that. I found it absolutely twisted and excellent. Kudos to Lu for putting that in. Want to know what it is? Buy a copy of the book now.

4.5 Bards for Warcross

Book Review: Genuine Fraud by E. Lockhart

The story of a young woman whose diabolical smarts are her ticket into a charmed life. But how many times can someone reinvent themselves? You be the judge.

Imogen is a runaway heiress, an orphan, a cook, and a cheat.
Jule is a fighter, a social chameleon, and an athlete.
An intense friendship. A disappearance. A murder, or maybe two.
A bad romance, or maybe three.
Blunt objects, disguises, blood, and chocolate. The American dream, superheroes, spies, and villains.
A girl who refuses to give people what they want from her.
A girl who refuses to be the person she once was. 

I am a massive fan of We Were Liars by E. Lockhart (Click the title to read my 5 Bard review)  so when Random House announced Genuine Fraud I was over the moon excited.

I can honestly say that I did not expect this book. Anything about it. It has everything that I love about some of my favorite classic novels:

An unreliable narrator (Example: Wuthering Heights)
Nonlinear Narrative (Example: Wuthering Heights) ***Look, I really love Wuthering Heights
Intrigue (Many classics)

Epic Beach Read

I could go on, but those are the basics that I am referencing. Lockhart is literally the queen of unreliable narrators in my book, because Jule and Cadence are similar only in their nonlinear unreliableness, but I love them both because of this and much more. Jule is much more hardened than Cadence and she spun so many lies and stories throughout this book that I found my head spinning but wanting more.

There are some incredibly hard things to read in this book and some of the plot points mentioned in the synopsis definitely happen.  Why yes, Murder is a part of the narrative (all True Crime fans rejoice!) and so are some doomed romances. Plus, Jule and Imogen get to visit some amazing places and have some epic experiences.

This is not one to be missed. I read it in 5 hours of sitting out in the sun on the beach, but I would have sat and read it in one sitting regardless.

Much like my review of We Were Liars, I can’t say much without giving a ton away!

Thank you, E. Lockhart, for doing it again.

4.5 Bards.

Waiting on Wednesday

Every week Breaking the Spine hosts the bookish meme for book bloggers to share what books they are waiting on to be released!  This week I’m waiting on:

Release Date: January 2, 2018

Before he was Batman, he was Bruce Wayne. A reckless boy willing to break the rules for a girl who may be his worst enemy.

The Nightwalkers are terrorizing Gotham City, and Bruce Wayne is next on their list.

One by one, the city’s elites are being executed as their mansions’ security systems turn against them, trapping them like prey. Meanwhile, Bruce is turning eighteen and about to inherit his family’s fortune, not to mention the keys to Wayne Enterprises and all the tech gadgetry his heart could ever desire. But after a run-in with the police, he’s forced to do community service at Arkham Asylum, the infamous prison that holds the city’s most brutal criminals.

Madeleine Wallace is a brilliant killer . . . and Bruce’s only hope.

In Arkham, Bruce meets Madeleine, a brilliant girl with ties to the Nightwalkers. What is she hiding? And why will she speak only to Bruce? Madeleine is the mystery Bruce must unravel. But is he getting her to divulge her secrets, or is he feeding her the information she needs to bring Gotham City to its knees? Bruce will walk the dark line between trust and betrayal as the Nightwalkers circle closer.

Book Review: Wonder Woman Warbringer by Leigh Bardugo

Daughter of immortals.

Princess Diana longs to prove herself to her legendary warrior sisters. But when the opportunity finally comes, she throws away her chance at glory and breaks Amazon law—risking exile—to save a mortal. Diana will soon learn that she has rescued no ordinary girl, and that with this single brave act, she may have doomed the world.

Daughter of death.

Alia Keralis just wanted to escape her overprotective brother with a semester at sea. She doesn’t know she is being hunted by people who think her very existence could spark a world war. When a bomb detonates aboard her ship, Alia is rescued by a mysterious girl of extraordinary strength and forced to confront a horrible truth: Alia is a Warbringer—a direct descendant of the infamous 

Helen of Troy, fated to bring about an age of bloodshed and misery.

Together.

Two girls will face an army of enemies—mortal and divine—determined to either destroy or possess the Warbringer. Tested beyond the bounds of their abilities, Diana and Alia must find a way to unleash hidden strengths and forge an unlikely alliance. Because if they have any hope of saving both their worlds, they will have to stand side by side against the tide of war.

First thing you should know about me is that I tend to be a Marvel Comic purist. Why? Well, my dad was the one who used to buy me comics and he was a Marvel fan over DC, so that’s basically the gist.  However, once I started receiving an allowance, I would pick up the Wonder Woman comics on occasion.  Still wasn’t one of my must-read-every-month comics, but I loved Diana’s story and her adventures.

This book is even beautiful naked.

All this in mind, why would I want to read this book? Two reasons: 1. the movie starring Gal Gadot was absolutely fantastic and it reignited my interest in Wonder Woman’s story. 2. Leigh Bardugo was writing the book (she’s so great).

Much like the movie, the action in Bardugo’s Wonder Woman picks up immediately, and much to my dismay, also like the movie, we spend very little time with Hippolyta and the Amazons on Themyscira. What can I say, I just want to spend a lot of time with all of those kick ass women. Also, Bardugo explores the Amazonian origins in respect to how those living on Themyscira arrived on the island, and this is something that I suppose I never learned about during my sporadic reading or just didn’t remember, so I really enjoyed that.

Bardugo’s characterization of Diana is pretty spot on: feeling unworthy of her life on Themyscira, feeling unable to live up to Hippolyta’s expectations, wanting more than “this provincial life” (*pats self on back for Beauty & the Beast reference*), and being generally curious of life off of the island. I felt like she hit all the right notes for me to go ahead and relate to Diana the minute I started to read.

I loved the mythology in this novel about the descendants of Helen of Troy. It was glorious. The idea of the woman who launched a thousand ships being the precursor to a line of warbringers is so great. I tried to look up to see if this was ever an idea in the comics, but from what I can find (and feel free to correct me) this is a wholly original idea by Bardugo. SO many props to her for this.

There are some serious twists and turns in this book, ones that I definitely weren’t expecting, and I read this book in one sitting on the beach. I didn’t go in the water or play games with my family because I was so engrossed in Diana and Alia’s story. Also, for making the story completely focused on the two main female characters and backseating the males…ALSO MORE PROPS.

Thank you, Leigh Bardugo, for keeping me on my toes and making me fall in love with Wonder Woman all over again.

4.5 Bards

Blog Tour and Giveaway: And Then There Were Four by Nancy Werlin

 

 


BOOK SUMMARY:

Let’s not die today. Not even to make things easier for our parents.

When a building collapses around five teenagers–and they just barely escape–they know something strange is going on. Little by little, the group pieces together a theory: Their parents are working together to kill them all. Is it true? And if so, how did their parents come together–and why? And, most importantly, how can the five of them work together to save themselves? With an unlikely group of heroes, sky-high stakes, and two budding romances, this gripping murder mystery will keep readers guessing until the last page.

 

 

AUTHOR BIO:

Nancy Werlin is the New York Times bestselling and award-winning author of The Killer’s Cousin, The Rules of Survival, Impossible, and a host of other young adult novels. She received her BA from Yale, was named a Publishers Weekly Flying Start author for her first novel, and has since established herself as a writer of literary teen suspense. Werlin lives with her husband near Boston, Massachusetts.

 

 

REVIEW: 

WHOA.

What do you get when you cross an incredibly diverse cast of characters in a thriller with some incredibly unpredictable twists and turns? And Then There Were Four.  I have to assume that the title of this book is an homage to Agatha Christie’s roller coaster murder mystery, And Then There Were None, and I definitely see why this is made due to the high stakes and the fast paced plot.

This is a novel you will not want to put down, and I read it in just around four hours.

Readers are immediately introduced to our wonderful characters, but the story is dual narration between two of the five main characters.  I have to applaud Werlin for effectively using the second person for one of these narrators, because I have only read one another young adult novel that I found utilized this in a good way and that was Stolen by Lucy Christopher, and even then the “you” was referring to her kidnapper.  Caleb, the character narrating in second person, uses the “you” in referring to himself.  I believe Werlin did this to exemplify the amount of emotional and mental abuse that the character had suffered throughout his life.

The other narrator, Saralinda, is in first person. I will say, that I found her narration to be a bit annoying as it was very stream-of-consciousness. While this is effective and it really does clearly separate the two narrators well, it really just makes it hard to read in places due to the lack of grammatical marks and the sentence structure.  That is probably my only critique of the novel because I found the book to be such a great story overall.

I also worry about giving too much away in this review, because it’s one of those narratives that you need to peel back like layers of an onion. Because almost every page is carefully crafted by Werlin to slowly build to the big reveal.

Trust me, you do NOT want to miss out on reading this phenomenal thriller.

And Then There Were Four is out today!

4.5 Bards

 

 

 

PLAYLIST: 

These are a list of songs that really struck me as something that either these characters would listen to, or would be playing in the background of scenes in a cinematic setting.

GIVEAWAY:

 

a Rafflecopter giveaway

GIVEAWAY LEGAL COPY:

Enter for a chance to win one (1) of five (5) copies of And Then There Were Four by Nancy Werlin (ARV: $18.99 each).

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. Enter between 12:00 AM Eastern Time on June 5, 2017 and 12:00 AM on June 19, 2017.  Open to residents of the fifty United States and the District of Columbia who are 13 and older. Winners will be selected at random on or about June 22, 2017. Odds of winning depend on number of eligible entries received. Void where prohibited or restricted by law.

Book Review: Scythe by Neal Shusterman

Please welcome the newest member of Team Midsummer: Leia! Leia and Jess both grew up in the suburbs of Charlotte, NC but didn’t meet until they were both students at East Carolina University. After serving as Orientation Assistants during the summer of 2008, they stayed in touch. Give a big welcome to her and help us celebrate her first official review:

Leia holds her Ph.D. in Educational Foundations and Inquiry and is currently a professor of Educational Research. She has been an avid reader for as long as she can remember, and is absolutely obsessed with everything Potter. Her favorite book series include Harry Potter, A Court of Thorns and Roses, and the Gemma Doyle trilogy. She is also obsessed with pugs.

 

 

A world with no hunger, no disease, no war, no misery: humanity has conquered all those things, and has even conquered death. Now Scythes are the only ones who can end life—and they are commanded to do so, in order to keep the size of the population under control.

Citra and Rowan are chosen to apprentice to a scythe—a role that neither wants. These teens must master the “art” of taking life, knowing that the consequence of failure could mean losing their own.

Scythe is the first novel of a thrilling new series by National Book Award–winning author Neal Shusterman in which Citra and Rowan learn that a perfect world comes only with a heavy price.

I needed a good story to help break through my post-ACOWAR book hangover, and I certainly found it in Scythe. I have meandered between books, not really committing to any one in particular (and finishing all at a slow pace since none could keep my attention for long)… until I stumbled upon this book.

Shusterman is a name that I tend to hear in passing in the book clubs that I frequent, but I had never read his work before. A friend picked up Scythe and insisted that it was right up my alley – and I can’t thank her enough. It is a fast paced read which picks up to a break-neck speed about halfway through. This is definitely a book that I lost sleep over this week.

Humanity has reached a point where death is no longer a guarantee. Instead of continuing to age, individuals are able to turn back their genes in order to relive their younger years – often resetting to their early twenties. Sickness and pain are things of the past, as “nanites” are injected into the bloodstream of all people in order to keep their bodies healthy and healed. “Splatting,” the process of killing yourself in creative ways, has become a popular past time – splatters are revived and able to continue their lives within a few days. This presents a problem, of course, as people continue to reproduce and the earth is more and more populated.

In order to cull the population, Scythes are trained and ordained to glean the lives of individuals. Each Scythe, however, is given the freedom to glean as they see fit. The book follows Citra and Rowan as they serve and apprenticeship under the great Scythe Faraday.

Citra and Rowan are fantastic as main characters, and I found myself holding my breath as their journey into Scythedom intensified. While a romantic interest between the two is hinted at, it is not a main part of the story itself. This would normally be a turn off for me – I am definitely a fan of romance – but its near-absence never phased me. I feel that anything more than what is present would have felt wrong for the characters, which are focused instead on perfecting the art of death.

I am notorious for predicting story arcs and twists, but never saw the majority of this book coming. Because of this, I am hesitant to say more about the book, lest I spoil something for future readers. The experience was one that I will not soon forget.

4.5 Bards

 

Discovering Dessen: A Brief Essay

There was this old used book store about five minutes from where I grew up that my Mom and Mawmaw used to take me to.  Now, when I say “take me to,” it wasn’t necessarily for my own enjoyment. Although I did fall in love with a good murder mystery there, and it’s where I found my first copy of Agatha Christie’s And Then There Were None.

The store was built out of what looked like singed wood from a moldy forest, and it smelled like moth balls inside.  The majority of the store was filled with old Harlequin romance novels, the same thing that my Mawmaw always read.  You know the type; the covers were always a beefcake with no shirt and a scantily clad woman in what looked like ripped lingerie.  Either way, she’d wander her way through the stacks, and I’d just play hide and seek with an invisible friend while I was in my early years, and then would just strut around bored in my early teens.  

Until one day when I discovered a new shelf.  It was small, maybe twelve books that were for middle grade or young adults.  Granted, I can honestly say that the shelf wasn’t necessarily labeled, not that I remember, at least, but that the covers weren’t so risqué.  The covers were either illustrated or were of inanimate objects to indicate some sort of theme in the novel.  However, the book that caught my eye was a lonely pier jutting out into a beautiful blue body of water, and it had a solitary human image.  Naturally this was the book I picked up and begged my Mawmaw to buy for me for the $1.25 that the store was asking for. (I feel like it’s needless to say at this point that the store is no longer open, as their prices weren’t exactly sustainable.)

This book was Dreamland by Sarah Dessen.

Honestly, I don’t remember exactly what impact this book made on me, or if it was one of my favorite reads at the time, but her name stuck with me. I liked Dessen’s novel enough to remember to look for her name in the bookstore.  It wasn’t long before I had devoured her other three novels, That Summer, Keeping the Moon, and Someone like You. During this time I was playing on a traveling softball team on the weekends, so we would end up in the car for a few hours driving to and from fields, and we would also have an hour or two to kill between games…so I would read.

No other book that I can remember stuck out to me more than Dessen’s next novel This Lullaby.  This was the book that I found by chance in the bookstore when we were at the beach for a softball tournament as this was way before I got into book blogging or even knew what day new books were released.  We were just killing time, hitting up the food court for lunch, and wandering in and out of stores. Even then I was known as a bit of a book nerd, since I was the one who always had a novel on hand and a book suggestion on the tip of my tongue.  So it was no surprise that I practically demanded to go into the bookstore.  

At this point, I don’t remember if there was a specific young adult book shelf like there is now, or rather, a whole section, but I remember seeing Dessen’s name and immediately grabbing the hardcover off the shelf. This novel quickly became one of my all-time favorite books, and that hasn’t changed 15 years later.
Remy’s extreme negative attitude toward relationships and love spoke to me on so many levels.  As a teenager, I was extremely jaded already, because this character made me feel like I was reading my own thoughts.  Not only was Remy an amazingly relatable character, but Dexter quickly became my first book boyfriend (Huzzah!).

My first copy of This Lullaby eventually fell apart from me carrying it in my bat bag, my friends’ borrowing it, and from reading it over and over. I went to the store to pick up a new copy, paperback, this time, and found The Truth About Forever.

I cannot credit anyone with my love of young adult literature more than I can credit Sarah Dessen.  

When I was a teenager struggling with first love, my eating disorder, deaths in the family, etc, her novels spoke to me on a level I didn’t realize books could.

Two years ago I finally had the chance to meet Sarah in person for the first time, and it was like meeting a lifelong hero for me.  I was 28, but I may as well have been 13 again, because all those emotions of reading Dreamland and This Lullaby came back.  It was one of the highlights of being a book blogger and reader, so the release of Dessen’s thirteenth novel reminds me that I’ve been reading her novels since I WAS thirteen.  It’s serendipitous, in a way, because Once and For All takes me back to all of the feelings I had about This Lullaby more than any of her others.

Louna and Ambrose will sit in my mind just as much as Remy and Dexter, Macy and Wes, Auden and Eli, and so many more Dessen characters.

So I have to throw out a thank you to Sarah Dessen for being there for me since I was 13 and for being a go-to read for me for seventeen years. That’s crazy! Seventeen (which is fewer than the number of times I’ve read This Lullaby. Not a lie.)

Once and For All comes out on June 6, 2017 and it is not a book to be missed.

Blog Tour & Giveaway: The One Memory of Flora Banks by Emily Barr


For my stop on the Penguin Teen Blog Tour, I was able to interview Emily Barr about her first young adult novel, The One Memory of Flora Banks!  Not sure what this book is about?  Check out the synopsis below!

Seventeen-year-old Flora Banks has no short-term memory. Her mind resets itself several times a day, and has since the age of ten, when the tumor that was removed from Flora’s brain took with it her ability to make new memories. That is, until she kisses Drake, her best friend’s boyfriend, the night before he leaves town. Miraculously, this one memory breaks through Flora’s fractured mind, and sticks. Flora is convinced that Drake is responsible for restoring her memory and making her whole again. So when an encouraging email from Drake suggests she meet him on the other side of the world, Flora knows with certainty that this is the first step toward reclaiming her life.

With little more than the words “be brave” inked into her skin, and written reminders of who she is and why her memory is so limited, Flora sets off on an impossible journey to Svalbard, Norway, the land of the midnight sun, determined to find Drake. But from the moment she arrives in the arctic, nothing is quite as it seems, and Flora must “be brave” if she is ever to learn the truth about herself, and to make it safely home.

Now that you’re all informed about what this book is about, let’s get to the interview!


Midsummer Reads-Jess:  After years of writing adult fiction novels, what made you want to delve into the world of Young Adult fiction?

Emily Barr (EB): It was really the book that came first: Flora’s story was in my head even though I was trying to write something completely different. When I started writing, it as an adult book, but it didn’t quite working. I tried making her younger and writing it as Young Adult fiction and everything fell into place. That opened up a whole new wonderful world for me!

MR-Jess: What was your inspiration for Flora’s story?

EB: The thing that came first was the Arctic setting. I was dreaming of a book set in the endless daytime of an Arctic summer, with a protagonist who didn’t quite know what she was doing there. Also, I’d always wanted to write about memory and amnesia because I think that human brains are incredible, and this felt like the time to do it.


MR-Jess: What kind of research did you do on short term memory loss/anterograde amnesia in order to make the book true to reality and true to your narrative?

EB: I did a lot of reading. I read books by Oliver Sacks and others, and read medical research and papers. I have an old university friend who works in this area and who was incredibly helpful to me.

From our Instagram @Midsummerreads


MR- Jess: How did you keep the “Boy Cure,” stereotype out of your novel? Did you purposefully want to circumvent that?

EB: Yes I did! I know it looks like a “boy cure” initially from Flora’s unreliable perspective, but as the story progresses it becomes clear that things are not at all as straightforward as they seem. I wanted to take that stereotype and subvert it.


MR- Jess: Why does the memory of her kissing her best friend’s boyfriend stick around? Why did you pick this specific moment for her to remember?

EB: It was a heightened moment for her, and it meant that her memory could be pinned to a specific person which would give her a mission: she would be consumed by the need to find the person again and see whether being close to him again made her memory work.


MR – Jess: What made you choose Svalbard, Norway?  Why was the Arctic such an important narrative choice for you?

EB: I just had it in my head: I’m not sure where it came from but I was longing to write a book set in the Arctic. I did some research about locations, and Svalbard seemed to be the exact place that I was imagining. In the end I couldn’t shake it off, so I cracked, cleared a week and went there. It was everything I’d dreamed of, and more, and the book flowed straight from that visit.

In fact I wrote so much about not going there in winter (when Flora visits, it’s May and daylight all the time; people are always telling her not to go in winter when it’s dark all day and night) that I got intrigued, and went there last January. It was dark and incredibly cold, but there were Northern Lights in the sky and the whole experience was spectacular.


MR-Jess: What are you working on next?  Can we expect another Young Adult Novel from you?

EB: You can! It’s set in Rio (pretty much the opposite of Svalbard in many ways) and it’s about a girl discovering, as her life falls apart, that nothing has been what it seemed. It’s a very fast paced twisty thriller.
Special thanks to Emily Barr and Penguin Random House for this interview and the chance to read FLORA!

Giveaway:

Enter for a chance to win one (1) of five (5) copies of The One Memory of Flora Banks by Emily Barr (ARV: $17.99 each).
NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. Enter between 12:00 AM Eastern Time on May 1, 2017 and 12:00 AM on May 22, 2017.  Open to residents of the fifty United States and the District of Columbia who are 13 and older. Winners will be selected at random on or about May 24, 2017. Odds of winning depend on number of eligible entries received. Void where prohibited or restricted by law.

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The One Memory of Flora Banks


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