Book Review: Daughter of the Pirate King by Tricia Levenseller

There will be plenty of time for me to beat him soundly once I’ve gotten what I came for.
Sent on a mission to retrieve an ancient hidden map—the key to a legendary treasure trove—seventeen-year-old pirate captain Alosa deliberately allows herself to be captured by her enemies, giving her the perfect opportunity to search their ship.
More than a match for the ruthless pirate crew, Alosa has only one thing standing between her and the map: her captor, the unexpectedly clever and unfairly attractive first mate, Riden. But not to worry, for Alosa has a few tricks up her sleeve, and no lone pirate can stop the Daughter of the Pirate King. 

This book. This dang book. I was in a slump before i started this and in all honesty this just made my slump worse because of how good it was. Here is why i loved it so much:

  • I originally didn’t want to get this book because i was holding out hoping for an audio book version(there is one now, get it here). In the end my friend and i both got discount cards for going to a book signing. We were only there for the day so we both ended up getting a book. I picked out this one. I really lucked out because it is a signed copy! I’m super happy i didn’t get the audio book because the way the I visualize the characters is nothing like how it is done in the audio book(this isn’t bad but some days i have to read books and others i have to listen to them. Nothing wrong with doing either.)
  • I’ve seen all of the Pirate’s of the Caribbean movies(spoiler alert, The last one was so anticlimactic. Please just let this series be over.) but this book puts every single one of those movies to shame.  
  • The book is so vibrant and action packed. I loved the adventure. I loved how it sucked me in and i did not want to finish it because of what the world looked like in my mind’s eye. I loved the world building.  I loved how the main character was a feminist and knew that woman were priceless assets to her crew.  I really loved this book.
  • Whenever i’m in the water(specifically the ocean) i finally feel at home.  I feel a sense of peace wash over me. I feel safe. I feel like the she is protecting me. Like she wants to keep me safe.  There is a passage in this book that resonated with me when it comes to my feels about this ocean/sea. It is:

“Even a man who’s spent his whole life at sea has reason to fear her when she’s angry.  But not I. I sleep soundly. Listening to her music. The sea watches over me.  She protects her own.“ Chapter 4

  • Recently i have been having a very hard time with my mental illness and managing it. Ms. Tricia Levenseller wrote a line that when i read it i had to stop reading because i was going to start crying. 

“Everyone has something dark in their past.  I suppose it’s our job to overcome it. And if we can’t overcome it, then all we can do is make the best of it.” Chapter 5

  • Alsoa overcomes so many obstacles in it. She is a very strong heroine.  The more we learn about her, how she thinks, how she acts, how she simply plays the game of life.  She made me want to be strong.

Anyone who wants a strong heroine and who can hold up her own in a fight should pick this book up ASAP.  I can not wait for the sequel to come out in 2018.

This book is in my top five favorite new released for 2017. 5 Bards

Book Review & Giveway: The Valiant by Lesley Livingston

Princess. Captive. Gladiator.

Fallon is the daughter of a proud Celtic king, the sister of the legendary warrior Sorcha, and the sworn enemy of Julius Caesar.

When Fallon was a child, Caesar’s armies invaded her homeland, and her beloved sister was killed in battle.

Now, on the eve of her seventeenth birthday, Fallon is eager to follow in her sister’s footsteps and earn her place in the fearsome Cantii war band. She never gets the chance.

Fallon is captured and sold to an elite training school for female gladiators—owned by none other than Julius Caesar. In a cruel twist of fate, the man who destroyed Fallon’s family might be her only hope of survival.

Now Fallon must overcome vicious rivalries and deadly fights—in and out of the arena. And perhaps the most dangerous threat of all: her forbidden yet irresistible feelings for Cai, a young Roman soldier.

I swear, I went from reading about two contemporary bad ass women in Done Dirt Cheap to reading about bad ass women in at the height of the Roman Empire. Can we just keep these powerful female narratives flowing?  All of them have a reader in me!

In all honesty, I’ve never seen Gladiator.  I’ve never really paid a whole lot of attention this time period in history, so most of my knowledge of Julius Caesar comes from Shakespeare’s tragedy.  So to say that I had no idea of the wealth of information that can be expanded upon in this time is pretty much an understatement, but I learned so much just talking to Lesley and hearing how passionate she is on the subject.  If I didn’t have so many books to already read, I’d probably pick up a few on Ancient Rome.  Although, I feel like there’s probably a Wikipedia spiral on this topic in my future.

Anyway, let’s start with a bit about where Lesley got the inspiration to write about this topic (see the lovely video):

This book gave me life.

Everything about it spoke to me. I have a rough relationship with my sister, Fallon has a rough relationship with her sister.  Fallon is a bit reckless and is constantly wanting to prove herself, I have those same qualities.  I think there is a lot about this book that teenagers will take from this.  That there are always bad ass women in history that have been marginalized or forgotten due to the nature of HIStorical recording, and that women can chart their own paths. I sincerely wish this has been out when I was scheduling the books for my Feminist Book club this year, because I think it can bring a lot of great discussion about the status of women then and how this narrative can showcase the women’s movement today through its story.

Favorite tertiary character in The Valiant is by far Cleopatra.  That’s right, THE Cleopatra.  Now, she’s not in the book a whole lot, but she has one of my absolute favorite lines in the novel, one that, if I’m going to another women’s march, I might put on a sign: “A woman ought to be able to chart her own course in life.” YAS QUEEN. *bows to the queen* Also, according to Livingston, the timeline of The Valiant puts Cleopatra in her early twenties as a young mother since she and Caesar were “very close friends,” which means the narrative takes place around two years prior to the assassination of Caesar and the Ides of March (which, coincidentally, was yesterday).  Apparently this is something to remember because when I asked her about this in regards to the sequel, The Defiant, Livingston promptly started to mumble nonsense instead of answering (Seriously, I love this woman).

Livingston manages to explore the complexities of familial relationships and friendships, but the different aspects of first love and how moving on from heartbreak is hard but necessary. This entire novel is fast paced and is filled with action after action.  You will not be bored and you will fall in love with this book.

5 Bards.

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Book Review: Wintersong by S. Jae-Jones

 

All her life, nineteen-year-old Liesl has heard tales of the beautiful, mysterious Goblin King. He is the Lord of Mischief, the Ruler Underground, and the muse around which her music is composed. Yet, as Liesl helps shoulder the burden of running her family’s inn, her dreams of composition and childish fancies about the Goblin King must be set aside in favor of more practical concerns.

But when her sister Käthe is taken by the goblins, Liesl journeys to their realm to rescue her sister and return her to the world above. The Goblin King agrees to let Käthe go—for a price. The life of a maiden must be given to the land, in accordance with the old laws. A life for a life, he says. Without sacrifice, nothing good can grow. Without death, there can be no rebirth. In exchange for her sister’s freedom, Liesl offers her hand in marriage to the Goblin King. He accepts.

Down in the Underground, Liesl discovers that the Goblin King still inspires her—musically, physically, emotionally. Yet even as her talent blossoms, Liesl’s life is slowly fading away, the price she paid for becoming the Goblin King’s bride. As the two of them grow closer, they must learn just what it is they are each willing to sacrifice: her life, her music, or the end of the world.

Release Date: February 7, 2017

I remember when I first heard about this novel.  It was in an email from one of the publicists at St. Martin’s, and she was trying to get us excited about the upcoming titles for Fall 2016, but she included a quick preview of Wintersong; it was the first five chapters.  I was enraptured from the first sentence.

I grew up on Labyrinth, Terry Jones and Monty Python, Bowie, and Jim Henson, so even the marketing of her saying that we’d “get introduced to the Goblin King,” peaked my interest back in September.  Side Note: I’m actually watching Labyrinth while I write this review…

First things first: S. Jae-Jones is such a strong writer. Not only did she provide such a succinct world, it honestly makes it feel like this was the story that should have been told in the movie.

In a lot of ways, I think that this is the story that David Bowie wanted to tell about the Goblin King.  This might be a slight spoiler, but a quote from Bowie prior to the release of Labyrinth is particularly fitting for the character of the King in the novel, “…(he) is, at best, a romantic; but at worst, he’s a spoiled child, vain and temperamental (sic)…I think he has inherited his Kingdom of Goblins reluctantly, and runs it under duress.”

I know I keep talking about the movie, and I will more later, but let me focus specifically on the novel itself.  Jae-Jones weaves music into the narrative as if it gives the story its soul.  The German roots of the story and the use of it’s language give it so much authenticity and contributes so much to putting the reader immediately within the story world.  Jae-Jones has truly created something extraordinary and a narrative that will stay with you.  This is a novel that I’d want to live in regardless of the peril and darkness. Her lyrical word choice and the eloquent sentence structure is that of true beauty and art. It’s been a long time since a novel has touched me as deeply as Wintersong.

While, yes, it pays deference to the movie and the original story, Jae-Jones’ take has made it so much more beautiful with a side of painful feels. I’m so glad that Jae-Jones expanded upon this enigmatic world and the Goblin King, who was such a sensual character.

Let me talk about Elisabeth.  She was everything that I wanted in a reluctant heroine/love interest.  She was talented, frustrated, and loyal as hell. If only Toby had Elisabeth instead of Sarah, Toby (Kathe) would have been saved much sooner. So many praises to Jae-Jones for creating this character and for making me adore her, flaws and all.  Those are the best types of characters, after all.

Jae-Jones’ Goblin King is a handsome, cruel lithe blonde man with dual colored eyes. Sound familiar? I’m so glad she had this homage to Bowie.  Please, please don’t think that this is all the novel is: a basic re-telling. It is SO MUCH MORE. I just really don’t want to give too much away, because I’d rather you read and fall in love on your own.  I just love both so much; so for me, knowing the movie really enriched my reading of the novel.

I want to thank S. Jae-Jones so much, for giving me back the Goblin King, and for giving the Goblin King so much more than the original story ever did. I always felt sympathy and love for him, but her novel makes everything so wonderfully complex and beautiful. I know at this point I’m repeating myself, but it is worth it to showcase how much I adored this book.

I’ll end this on the quotes from the book that saluted the movie:

“I’ve given you everything you’ve ever wanted.  I’m tired of living up to your expectations.” – The Goblin King, Wintersong
“I am exhausted from living up to your expectations.” – Jareth, Labyrinth

“I am a generous soul, Elisabeth…” The Goblin King, Wintersong
“I have been generous up until now.” – Jareth, Labyrinth

“I see the echoes of it within you.” – Elisabeth, Wintersong
“I can’t live within you.” – Jareth, Labyrinth

Seriously do yourself a favor and fall into the pages of Wintersong. You won’t regret it, I promise…or curse me to the Underground with the Goblin King.

5 Bards.

 

 

 

 

ABOUT THE AUTHOR

S. Jae-Jones (called JJ) is an artist, an adrenaline junkie, and erstwhile editrix. When not obsessing over books, she can be found jumping out of perfectly good airplanes, co-hosting the Pub(lishing) Crawl podcast, or playing dress-up. Born and raised in Los Angeles, she now lives in North Carolina, as well as many other places on the internet, including Twitter, Tumblr, Facebook, Instagram, and her blog.

 

 

 

 

Book Review: The Darkest Part of the Forest

Children can have a cruel, absolute sense of justice. Children can kill a monster and feel quite proud of themselves. A girl can look at her brother and believe they’re destined to be a knight and a bard who battle evil. She can believe she’s found the thing she’s been made for.

Hazel lives with her brother, Ben, in the strange town of Fairfold where humans and fae exist side by side. The faeries’ seemingly harmless magic attracts tourists, but Hazel knows how dangerous they can be, and she knows how to stop them. Or she did, once.

At the center of it all, there is a glass coffin in the woods. It rests right on the ground and in it sleeps a boy with horns on his head and ears as pointed as knives. Hazel and Ben were both in love with him as children. The boy has slept there for generations, never waking.

Until one day, he does…

As the world turns upside down, Hazel tries to remember her years pretending to be a knight. But swept up in new love, shifting loyalties, and the fresh sting of betrayal, will it be enough?

13 years ago, I was introduced to Holly Black by my friend in the form of Tithe, a book about faeries set in the modern world. Imagine my glee when I came across The Darkest Part of the Forest, the first book about faeries that Black has written since finishing up her Modern Faerie Tales books.

I read this book greedily, finishing it in a total of seven hours, and was not disappointed. Black sets up the world extremely well, giving you the lore of Fairfold, the legend of the monster at the heart of the forest, and some amazingly fleshed out characters.

Hazel and her older brother, Ben, have grown up knowing firsthand what living near the Fey was like. They spent their childhood days hunting down the creatures that would kill humans, using Ben’s musical gifts and the sword Hazel found by the lake; they spent their adolescent nights partying at the Horned Boy’s coffin; Ben’s best friend was a changeling. They knew to stay out of the forest on the Full Moon, lest they become victims of the Alderking’s revel. When the Horned Boy wakes, things are set in motion that changes Hazel, Ben, and all of Fairfold irrevocably.

Black weaves several stories around each other gracefully, culminating in a tense climax that had me holding my breath. Her way of writing always surprises me, she pulls twists out where I never would have expected them, and ties everything together very neatly. One of my favorite aspects of this book was even the mentions of the “upstart knight” ruling over the Unseelie Court, which would strike a pleasant chord with anyone who has read the Modern Faerie Tales books, but does not distract from the plot if they haven’t.

I’ve read Tithe almost 30 times, and the subsequent companion novels over ten times each. Black is easily one of my favorite authors, and I know I’m going to be recommending this book to anyone who asks.

5 Bards.

fivebards

 

 

 

This review was submitted to A Midsummer Night’s Read by Lindsey. 

Summer of Sarah Dessen: Review of Saint Anything

saintanythingPeyton, Sydney’s charismatic older brother, has always been the star of the family, receiving the lion’s share of their parents’ attention and—lately—concern. When Peyton’s increasingly reckless behavior culminates in an accident, a drunk driving conviction, and a jail sentence, Sydney is cast adrift, searching for her place in the family and the world. When everyone else is so worried about Peyton, is she the only one concerned about the victim of the accident?

Enter the Chathams, a warm, chaotic family who run a pizza parlor, play bluegrass on weekends, and pitch in to care for their mother, who has multiple sclerosis. Here Sydney experiences unquestioning acceptance. And here she meets Mac, gentle, watchful, and protective, who makes Sydney feel seen, really seen, for the first time.

Check out the book trailer!

There’s a certain amount of magic in every Sarah Dessen novel that is hard to quantify. They are not full of “actual” magic as her books are contemporary in nature, but her story telling abilities are almost ethereal.

Not unlike her previous novels, Dessen really explores the teenage female psyche with skill and still manages to create a character with a unique voice. Sydney’s outlook on life and her circumstances set her apart from Dessen’s other narrators, but still manages to place her firmly within the canon.

The narrative will draw you in from the first scene, which opens in the courthouse for Peyton’s sentencing, and immediately you feel Sydney’s longing for a place in her family that revolves around the oldest son with behavior problems.  I love how the tension began to escalate quickly after the introduction of a specific character, and Dessen does a great job of establishing the antagonistic relationship between the two subtly.

While Sydney is a bit of a pushover at the beginning of the story, it is important to note that she still has her agency when she decides that she wants to make a big change in her life and transfer out of the school she grew up in and away from her only friends to make a new start.  I do enjoy the “journey” trope in young adult literature and this was the beginning of Sydney’s journey to “being seen” by people who made her feel important and loved.

I think the overall arching theme in this novel is something that Dessen summed up to me in the interview I had with her prior to her book event in Chapel Hill with the song Brave by Sara Bareillies.  Sydney was brave enough to change her life in a big way and ultimately a better way.  She was brave enough to face the guilt that came along with Peyton’s actions.  She was brave enough to prove herself to her family.  And of course, she was brave enough to love.

As a fan of Dessen’s work I can tell you that this book will leave you wanting more.  Who else wants to live in Lakeview?

5 Bards to Sarah Dessen’s wonderful 12th novel, and here is to 12 more.

 

fivebards

Book Review: The Start of Me and You by Emery Lord

the start of me and youIt’s been a year since it happened—when Paige Hancock’s first boyfriend died in an accident. After shutting out the world for two years, Paige is finally ready for a second chance at high school . . . and she has a plan. First: Get her old crush, Ryan Chase, to date her—the perfect way to convince everyone she’s back to normal. Next: Join a club—simple, it’s high school after all. But when Ryan’s sweet, nerdy cousin, Max, moves to town and recruits Paige for the Quiz Bowl team (of all things!) her perfect plan is thrown for a serious loop. Will Paige be able to face her fears and finally open herself up to the life she was meant to live?

Wow.  Brilliant.  Wonderfully real.  Emotional.  I firmly believe that Emery Lord struck gold with this novel.  I cannot even think about this story without it bringing tears to my eyes.

This novel is first and foremost about grief.  Lord does a phenomenal job at showcasing the struggle that people go through when trying to move past such a defining moment in life, and how detrimental it is to handle it with the utmost care.  Paige’s grief has manifested itself in an intense fear of water and drowning, nightmares, and isolation.  She has isolated herself from a social life in high school and has alienated herself from herself.  That sounds a bit confusing, but she has started to also define herself as the girl with a dead boyfriend, rather than moving past it.  That is what is so brilliant about Lord’s portrayal of Paige.  Paige wants more than anything to get out of that rut and begin to define herself again.  It provides an excellent narrative arc that also allows the reader to struggle along with Paige.

Paige has an amazing support system throughout The Start of Me and You.  Her three best friends, Tessa, Kayleigh, and Morgan are the absolute best example of how friends can really help you through the toughest times.  No lie, it really made me miss my two best friends from high school, because we are scattered through the east coast now!  All of the girls were also well written as individuals that function as a part of a whole unit.  I loved that these characters could stand on their own with their differences, but they worked better as a friend group.  Paige isn’t the only one who has problems, but they continually step up to help one another through anything.

As for the two main male characters, Max and Ryan, I think that Lord concocted a very interesting juxtaposition between them, especially since they are best friends.  Ryan is described as being bright blonde and blue eyed, while Max has darker hair, green eyes, and glasses.  Ryan is the hot guy jock and Max is the adorable, gangly nerd. The novel immediately sets up Ryan as the main love interest for Paige, but Lord does a good job of displaying how Paige and Ryan would not fit, regardless of how stubborn Paige is in her crush.  While Max sneaks up on Paige and her heart, it was clear to me from the beginning that she would end up with him, but that did not deter me at all.  As Max says in the story,

Max's Post Secret (Made by Me)

Max’s Post Secret (Made by Me)

“Knowing what happens is different from knowing how it happens. And the getting there is the best part.”

Lord really outdid herself with the relationship between Paige and her Grandmother.  Not only was Grammy struggling with the early stages of Alzheimer’s, but she suffers from two strokes as well.  Paige is extremely close to Grammy and considers her the only person she can share secrets with.  They have such excellent conversations, and the dialogue in these scenes is on point.  Lord made me cry a number of times during the scenes with Grammy, as it really reminded me of my relationship with my Mawmaw, who passed on a few years ago.

This novel really hit home with me, and I hope everyone will pick up a copy and read it.

5 Bards.

fivebards

Book Review: Ensnared by A.G. Howard

After surviving a disastrous battle at prom, Alyssa has embraced her madness and gained perspective. She’s determined to rescue her two worlds and the people and netherlings she loves. Even if it means challenging Queen Red to a final battle of wills and wiles . . . and even if the only way to Wonderland, now that the rabbit hole is closed, is through the looking-glass world—-a parallel dimension filled with mutated and sadistic netherling outcasts.

In the final installment of the Splintered trilogy, Alyssa and her dad journey into the heart of magic and mayhem in search of her mom and to set right all that’s gone wrong. Together with Jeb and Morpheus, they must salvage Wonderland from the decay and destruction that has ensnared it. But even if everyone succeeds and comes out alive, can they all truly have their happily ever after?

Release Date: January 6, 2015

I finished Ensnared almost two months ago, but I am just now writing this review.  Why? Well, I am devastated that one of my favorite trilogies of all time has ended.  Not only have I always considered myself as an Alice in Wonderland fanatic, but I now consider myself a Splintered fanatic. This trilogy really was an immaculate reimagining of the Wonderland universe and its characters.  I don’t know if that really expresses how much I love this story, but I’ll try to get on with the review and stop gushing.

Ensnared Tweet

Ensnared does an excellent job of keeping the action up and continues to hold you in suspense for the first chapters on what exactly happened to Jeb and Morpheus when they were trapped in a dying and infected Wonderland after the envents in Unhinged.  In fact, I was kind of on the fence about which suitor I preferred when going into the final installment, but after seeing the changes in both Jeb and Morpheus in this novel, it was clear which one I preferred.  (*cough* MORPHEUS *cough*)

I’m not going to lie when I say I downright hated Jeb at the beginning of this novel.  He definitely had talked himself into a mood and rejected any feelings he had for Alyssa in the past, which made him bitter and hard.  Morpheus, on the other hand, was still the clever trickster and was just as in love with Alyssa as always.  One of my favorite characteristics of him is that he is so open about it, despite his joking tone.

Alyssa has really grown as a character since the first novel, and she is down right vicious with some of her gifts in this book.  It is really great to see her come into her own and really embrace the Wonderland side of herself.  I also really liked that her father got to get in on the action in this book instead of being left behind at home.  I like that Howard really connected and brought her parents respective stories together and showcased their relationship with one another as well.

Howard just did a fantastic job. I cannot go into more or I’ll likely give away some plot points that are vital and I’d hate to ruin your reading experience!

5 Bards

fivebards

P.S. Howard informed me that there is a novella coming, so I don’t have to be too sad yet!

 

 

Book Review: Queen of the Tearling by Erika Johansen

18712886

It was on her nineteenth birthday that the soldiers came for Kelsea Glynn. They’d come to escort her back to the place of her birth – and to ensure she survives long enough to be able to take possession of what is rightfully hers.
But like many nineteen-year-olds, Kelsea is unruly, has high principles and believes she knows better than her elders. Unlike many nineteen-year-olds, she is about to inherit a kingdom that is on its knees – corrupt, debauched and dangerous.
Kelsea will either become the most fearsome ruler the kingdom has ever known . . . or be dead within the week.

This was a different take on a dystopian novel.  They essentially went back to having a Monarchy after the democratic system didn’t work.  So it was set in the future but felt like you were reading a book set in the way back past.  Does that make sense??  If you have read this book help me out with the description!  I thought it was an interesting way to write a dystopian novel because the terminology was familiar, thus not needing an in depth explanation of the  culture and setting of the book.  I could have used some more information as to why they went back to this system but I think we will learn more in the upcoming books.

I really liked that this was not your typically fairytale/ romance/ princess book.  The princess did not need a handsome guy to save her, she saved herself.  Also there was like no romance in this book, there didn’t need to be any.  This was about a young girl finding her way and being an all around bad ass.  It kind of reminds me of a Game of Thrones type storyline.  Minus the incest and dragons.  The Mace reminds me of the Hound, and there are brothels and such.

Kelsea is a great character, she is normal looking and you really get to explore her strengths and weaknesses.  She is not perfect and has flaws and insecurities but that is what makes a great lead in a book.  I also really like the Fetch.  I can’t wait to read more about him!!!  I thought the book was great, it was a little long but worth it!  I would warn younger readers about the content in this book, its more like a PG 16 book.  There is definitely some strong language and adult sexual content and violence.  Other than that I would totally recommend this book to everyone!!

So good!

5 Bards

fivebards

 

 

Book Review: This is Sarah by Ally Malinekno

22360316When Colin Leventhal leaned out his bedroom window on the night of May 12th and said goodbye to his girlfriend, he never expected it would be forever. But when Sarah Evans goes missing that night, Colin’s world unravels as he transforms from the boyfriend next door to the main police suspect. Then one year later, at her memorial service, Colin makes a phone call that changes everything. Is it possible that Sarah is still alive? And if so how can he bring her back?

As Colin struggles with this possibility, across the street, Sarah’s little sister, Claire learns how to navigate the strange new landscape of life without her sister. While her parents fall apart, Claire remains determined to keep going even if it kills her.

 

So just in time for Halloween I read This is Sarah, a philological thriller (its the only kind of thriller I can read) about the lives of those left behind after Sarah’s disappearance.  Let me start by saying Ally Malinenko contacted us to read and review this book, otherwise I would have probably never picked it up on my own.  Like I said before I am not typically into this type of book, prefer more dystopian or romance driven books.  With that said I thought this was a fantastic book.

The one word that comes to mind with this book is Haunting.  Having the story told from Colin and Claire’s POV was genius, they were the two people who had the hardest time with the disappearance.  And Ally Malinenko weaves the tail of their suffering/healing throughout the year with grace and in such detail you feel connected to the characters.  Really the story is beautifully heartbreaking.  The desperation that Colin feels as he tries to hang on to hope that Sarah is alive still is chilling.  And Claire is trying to pick up the pieces of her life, while trying to get her parents to remember that she is still there was so real it makes you want to hug her.  I totally recommend this book to every reader.

5 Bards

 

 

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