Book Review: Genuine Fraud by E. Lockhart

The story of a young woman whose diabolical smarts are her ticket into a charmed life. But how many times can someone reinvent themselves? You be the judge.

Imogen is a runaway heiress, an orphan, a cook, and a cheat.
Jule is a fighter, a social chameleon, and an athlete.
An intense friendship. A disappearance. A murder, or maybe two.
A bad romance, or maybe three.
Blunt objects, disguises, blood, and chocolate. The American dream, superheroes, spies, and villains.
A girl who refuses to give people what they want from her.
A girl who refuses to be the person she once was. 

I am a massive fan of We Were Liars by E. Lockhart (Click the title to read my 5 Bard review)  so when Random House announced Genuine Fraud I was over the moon excited.

I can honestly say that I did not expect this book. Anything about it. It has everything that I love about some of my favorite classic novels:

An unreliable narrator (Example: Wuthering Heights)
Nonlinear Narrative (Example: Wuthering Heights) ***Look, I really love Wuthering Heights
Intrigue (Many classics)

Epic Beach Read

I could go on, but those are the basics that I am referencing. Lockhart is literally the queen of unreliable narrators in my book, because Jule and Cadence are similar only in their nonlinear unreliableness, but I love them both because of this and much more. Jule is much more hardened than Cadence and she spun so many lies and stories throughout this book that I found my head spinning but wanting more.

There are some incredibly hard things to read in this book and some of the plot points mentioned in the synopsis definitely happen.  Why yes, Murder is a part of the narrative (all True Crime fans rejoice!) and so are some doomed romances. Plus, Jule and Imogen get to visit some amazing places and have some epic experiences.

This is not one to be missed. I read it in 5 hours of sitting out in the sun on the beach, but I would have sat and read it in one sitting regardless.

Much like my review of We Were Liars, I can’t say much without giving a ton away!

Thank you, E. Lockhart, for doing it again.

4.5 Bards.

TTBF Author Repost Book Review: Legend by Marie Lu

Team Midsummer, Jessica & Lyv, are attending the Texas Teen Book Festival again this year in Austin, TX! To prepare and get ourselves amped-up for this event, we are reposting some of our reviews by some of the TTBF 17 authors! First up is Keynote Speaker Marie Lu! 

This review was originally posted on January 19, 2012

 

What was once the western United States is now home to the Republic, a nation perpetually at war with its neighbors. Born into an elite family in one of the Republic’s wealthiest districts, fifteen-year-old June is a prodigy being groomed for success in the Republic’s highest military circles. Born into the slums, fifteen-year-old Day is the country’s most wanted criminal. But his motives may not be as malicious as they seem.

From very different worlds, June and Day have no reason to cross paths – until the day June’s brother, Metias, is murdered and Day becomes the prime suspect. Caught in the ultimate game of cat and mouse, Day is in a race for his family’s survival, while June seeks to avenge Metias’ death. But in a shocking turn of events, the two uncover the truth of what has really brought them together, and the sinister lengths their country will go to keep its secrets.

Full of nonstop action, suspense, and romance, this novel is sure to move readers as much as it thrills.

Let me preface this by saying that I am a bit of a dystopian fiction junkie due to my Master’s thesis being focused on it. However, this first installment hasn’t provided much of the background information concerning how the Republic and Colonies came to be–so I can’t judge it on the political aspects of it yet (cough, Marxism, cough). Perhaps the second installment will give us more information…I hope.

I see the problem that many of reviewers have mentioned that the two narrators’ voices sound very similar. However, I’m not sure that this was unintentional. Both of them are prodigies in their own world, and have similar thinking patterns. This means that, YES, these characters will sound the same to an extent. Do I think there should have been more definition between the two? Of course, because it would only strengthen the novel, which is already strong in its own right. I agree with Lu’s decision to split this narrative into two point of views, because the reader would not understand Day’s story as deeply if told strictly from June’s point of view (and vice versa).

I’m not sure why people do not empathize with June as much as Day, because she has had her share of hardship as well–again this can explain why both characters are similar in personality and voice. I definitely enjoyed reading this, and hope that this trilogy isn’t another Matched fiasco, because Crossed ruined that trilogy for me.

Much like Divergent and Blood Red Road, these characters must complete a journey (of sorts) in order to discover secrets about themselves and the society in which they reside. Since Lu’s story is a somewhat typical young adult dystopian novel, there are some obvious similarities plot-wise. However, I do believe that the difference in the characterization really changes the perception of the story.

While it is not something completely new and groundbreaking, I still thoroughly enjoyed reading Legend. I recommend this for those who really enjoy any of the dystopian fiction coming out of the Young Adult genre. 4 Bards.

Book Review: Wonder Woman Warbringer by Leigh Bardugo

Daughter of immortals.

Princess Diana longs to prove herself to her legendary warrior sisters. But when the opportunity finally comes, she throws away her chance at glory and breaks Amazon law—risking exile—to save a mortal. Diana will soon learn that she has rescued no ordinary girl, and that with this single brave act, she may have doomed the world.

Daughter of death.

Alia Keralis just wanted to escape her overprotective brother with a semester at sea. She doesn’t know she is being hunted by people who think her very existence could spark a world war. When a bomb detonates aboard her ship, Alia is rescued by a mysterious girl of extraordinary strength and forced to confront a horrible truth: Alia is a Warbringer—a direct descendant of the infamous 

Helen of Troy, fated to bring about an age of bloodshed and misery.

Together.

Two girls will face an army of enemies—mortal and divine—determined to either destroy or possess the Warbringer. Tested beyond the bounds of their abilities, Diana and Alia must find a way to unleash hidden strengths and forge an unlikely alliance. Because if they have any hope of saving both their worlds, they will have to stand side by side against the tide of war.

First thing you should know about me is that I tend to be a Marvel Comic purist. Why? Well, my dad was the one who used to buy me comics and he was a Marvel fan over DC, so that’s basically the gist.  However, once I started receiving an allowance, I would pick up the Wonder Woman comics on occasion.  Still wasn’t one of my must-read-every-month comics, but I loved Diana’s story and her adventures.

This book is even beautiful naked.

All this in mind, why would I want to read this book? Two reasons: 1. the movie starring Gal Gadot was absolutely fantastic and it reignited my interest in Wonder Woman’s story. 2. Leigh Bardugo was writing the book (she’s so great).

Much like the movie, the action in Bardugo’s Wonder Woman picks up immediately, and much to my dismay, also like the movie, we spend very little time with Hippolyta and the Amazons on Themyscira. What can I say, I just want to spend a lot of time with all of those kick ass women. Also, Bardugo explores the Amazonian origins in respect to how those living on Themyscira arrived on the island, and this is something that I suppose I never learned about during my sporadic reading or just didn’t remember, so I really enjoyed that.

Bardugo’s characterization of Diana is pretty spot on: feeling unworthy of her life on Themyscira, feeling unable to live up to Hippolyta’s expectations, wanting more than “this provincial life” (*pats self on back for Beauty & the Beast reference*), and being generally curious of life off of the island. I felt like she hit all the right notes for me to go ahead and relate to Diana the minute I started to read.

I loved the mythology in this novel about the descendants of Helen of Troy. It was glorious. The idea of the woman who launched a thousand ships being the precursor to a line of warbringers is so great. I tried to look up to see if this was ever an idea in the comics, but from what I can find (and feel free to correct me) this is a wholly original idea by Bardugo. SO many props to her for this.

There are some serious twists and turns in this book, ones that I definitely weren’t expecting, and I read this book in one sitting on the beach. I didn’t go in the water or play games with my family because I was so engrossed in Diana and Alia’s story. Also, for making the story completely focused on the two main female characters and backseating the males…ALSO MORE PROPS.

Thank you, Leigh Bardugo, for keeping me on my toes and making me fall in love with Wonder Woman all over again.

4.5 Bards

Blog Tour: The Inevitable Collision of Birdie & Bash Book Excerpt

 

It’s our day on the Birdie & Bash blog tour and we are here to introduce you to a bit of the narrative!  Check out the synopsis, a bit about the author, and an exclusive excerpt below!

Birdie never meant to be at the party. Bash should have been long gone. But when they meet, a collision course is set off they may never recover from.

Sebastian Alvaréz is just trying to hold the pieces together: to not flunk out, to keep his sort-of-best friend Wild Kyle from doing something really bad, and to see his beloved Ma through chemo. But when he meets Birdie Paxton, a near-Valedictorian who doesn’t realize she’s smoking hot in her science pun T-shirt, at a party, an undeniable attraction sparks. And suddenly he’s not worried about anything. But before they are able to exchange numbers, they are pulled apart. A horrifying tragedy soon links Birdie and Bash together—but neither knows it. When they finally reconnect, and are starting to fall—hard—the events of the tragedy unfold, changing both their lives in ways they can never undo. 

Release Date: July 25, 2017

 

 

 

Candace Ganger is a young adult author, contributing writer for Hello Giggles, and obsesswive marathoner. Aside from having past lives as a singer, nanotechnology website editor, and the world’s worst vacuum sales rep, she’s also ghostwritten hundreds of projects for companies, best-selling fiction and award-winning nonfiction authors alike. Candace – aka – Candyland – has a severe Milky Way latter addiction + eats way too many donuts/doughnuts but all things in excess, amiright? FYI: She’s TOTALLY awkward in person (#sorrynotsorry). She lives in Ohio with her family.

 

 

 

Repost: Interview and Book Review: Three Dark Crowns by Kendare Blake

 

28374007In every generation on the island of Fennbirn, a set of triplets is born: three queens, all equal heirs to the crown and each possessor of a coveted magic. Mirabella is a fierce elemental, able to spark hungry flames or vicious storms at the snap of her fingers. Katharine is a poisoner, one who can ingest the deadliest poisons without so much as a stomachache. Arsinoe, a naturalist, is said to have the ability to bloom the reddest rose and control the fiercest of lions.

But becoming the Queen Crowned isn’t solely a matter of royal birth. Each sister has to fight for it. And it’s not just a game of win or lose…it’s life or death. The night the sisters turn sixteen, the battle begins.

The last queen standing gets the crown.

Holy moley this book was an excellent roller coaster of emotions and craziness.

Blake has created an absolutely intriguing story world where the isolated island members are pretty fanatical about their precious queens and they will do almost anything to see their queen crowned.

The narration in this story is a bit muddled at times, because the story seems to flow from character to character third person limited, so that way the reader is in the loop about all of the dealings behind the scenes, and everything that is going on within the three areas of the island where the girls are kept.  Obviously the reader gets the point of view of each of the queens, Katharine, Arsinoe, and Mirabella.  But we also get the point of views of those closest to them, Natalia and Pietyr for Katharine, Jules, Joseph, and Billy for Arsinoe, and Luca for Mirabella.  While I did find the narration switches to be confusing at times and sometimes the narrative voices blended together, it served the story well and it allowed for a few *gasp* moments during my read.

As for the queens themselves as characters: I can’t decide which one I like more.  Fierce Arsinoe who has overcome her faults and accepted her fate only to find her fate different by the end of the novel.  Loving Mirabella who can control raging fire but can’t control how much she loves and misses her sisters.  Shy Katharine who is stronger than anyone will give her credit for, despite her short comings.  They were all raised to hate and want to murder their siblings in order to take their crown, but fore the most part the girls are pretty reluctant.  It seems that for the most part, none of them actually hate each other, but are just kind of resigned to their lot in life…of having to commit murder in order to live.

It’s a pretty dark burden they all carry, but they do manage to find a bit of happiness in their worlds, although an unfortunate love triangle pops up that broke my heart for two different characters. Damn you, Blake for giving me feels.

The narrative has such a sense of urgency throughout the whole book, which is excellent considering the story takes place over a number of months leading up to the final conclusion of Beltane at the end of Three Dark Crowns.

The readers learn a pretty important plot point there at the end, one that will change the course of the next installment.  Overall the world building was excellent for a first fantasy novel, and I’m sure we will continue to get more details on the history of the prophecy for the triplets (I can hope!), and more insight into what happens if the queens fail to kill one another.

4.5 Bards! Keep an eye out for our interview with Kendare Blake from the Texas Teen Book Festival!

four.fivebards

 

 

 

 


Non-Fiction Friday: The Girls of Murder City & Giveaway

Blog Tour and Giveaway: And Then There Were Four by Nancy Werlin

 

 


BOOK SUMMARY:

Let’s not die today. Not even to make things easier for our parents.

When a building collapses around five teenagers–and they just barely escape–they know something strange is going on. Little by little, the group pieces together a theory: Their parents are working together to kill them all. Is it true? And if so, how did their parents come together–and why? And, most importantly, how can the five of them work together to save themselves? With an unlikely group of heroes, sky-high stakes, and two budding romances, this gripping murder mystery will keep readers guessing until the last page.

 

 

AUTHOR BIO:

Nancy Werlin is the New York Times bestselling and award-winning author of The Killer’s Cousin, The Rules of Survival, Impossible, and a host of other young adult novels. She received her BA from Yale, was named a Publishers Weekly Flying Start author for her first novel, and has since established herself as a writer of literary teen suspense. Werlin lives with her husband near Boston, Massachusetts.

 

 

REVIEW: 

WHOA.

What do you get when you cross an incredibly diverse cast of characters in a thriller with some incredibly unpredictable twists and turns? And Then There Were Four.  I have to assume that the title of this book is an homage to Agatha Christie’s roller coaster murder mystery, And Then There Were None, and I definitely see why this is made due to the high stakes and the fast paced plot.

This is a novel you will not want to put down, and I read it in just around four hours.

Readers are immediately introduced to our wonderful characters, but the story is dual narration between two of the five main characters.  I have to applaud Werlin for effectively using the second person for one of these narrators, because I have only read one another young adult novel that I found utilized this in a good way and that was Stolen by Lucy Christopher, and even then the “you” was referring to her kidnapper.  Caleb, the character narrating in second person, uses the “you” in referring to himself.  I believe Werlin did this to exemplify the amount of emotional and mental abuse that the character had suffered throughout his life.

The other narrator, Saralinda, is in first person. I will say, that I found her narration to be a bit annoying as it was very stream-of-consciousness. While this is effective and it really does clearly separate the two narrators well, it really just makes it hard to read in places due to the lack of grammatical marks and the sentence structure.  That is probably my only critique of the novel because I found the book to be such a great story overall.

I also worry about giving too much away in this review, because it’s one of those narratives that you need to peel back like layers of an onion. Because almost every page is carefully crafted by Werlin to slowly build to the big reveal.

Trust me, you do NOT want to miss out on reading this phenomenal thriller.

And Then There Were Four is out today!

4.5 Bards

 

 

 

PLAYLIST: 

These are a list of songs that really struck me as something that either these characters would listen to, or would be playing in the background of scenes in a cinematic setting.

GIVEAWAY:

 

a Rafflecopter giveaway

GIVEAWAY LEGAL COPY:

Enter for a chance to win one (1) of five (5) copies of And Then There Were Four by Nancy Werlin (ARV: $18.99 each).

NO PURCHASE NECESSARY. Enter between 12:00 AM Eastern Time on June 5, 2017 and 12:00 AM on June 19, 2017.  Open to residents of the fifty United States and the District of Columbia who are 13 and older. Winners will be selected at random on or about June 22, 2017. Odds of winning depend on number of eligible entries received. Void where prohibited or restricted by law.

Book Review: Once and For All by Sarah Dessen

Louna, daughter of famed wedding planner Natalie Barrett, has seen every sort of wedding: on the beach, at historic mansions, in fancy hotels and clubs. Perhaps that’s why she’s cynical about happily-ever-after endings, especially since her own first love ended tragically. When Louna meets charming, happy-go-lucky serial dater Ambrose, she holds him at arm’s length. But Ambrose isn’t about to be discouraged, now that he’s met the one girl he really wants.

If you aren’t aware of my pure love of Sarah Dessen’s work, feel free to check out my essay titled, “Discovering Dessen,” here.

I want to give a huge shout out to my OTSP Secret Sister for sending me an ARC of this book for my birthday, it was SUCH a wonderful surprise, and I read the whole novel in one sitting the night it arrived. Thank you so much!

Okay, now that my “business” is attended to, let’s get to the real reason any of you are here: the review of Dessen’s 13th novel. Her publishing career is officially a teenager! Now I’m embarassed because that was a ridiculous joke, but anyway…

Dessen never dawdles when it comes to kicking off her narratives and the voice of Louna comes to life immediately.  She’s headstrong, levelheaded, and really good at helping her mom out with the family wedding business. We find out rather quickly how cynical she is and how much pain she is in over a lost love, but the exact details about this are told in a very brilliant way.

Dessen weaves together flashbacks (told from most recent to the very beginning of the relationship that Louna had with her first love), and I think it’s absolutely wonderful.  Not only since she’s telling it backwards, kind of, but that there’s flashbacks to showcase the emotions that Louna was feeling and it really puts the reader head first into the same love that Louna felt.  Plus, we get some shoutouts to former characters and places from her books, which I always enjoy.  I know that some people don’t like the use of flashbacks as a narrative device, but I think Dessen’s way of doing it makes it much more fresh and less like an  old storytelling trick.

My Dessen Collection

I applaud Dessen for including a very heavy topic in this book that we haven’t really seen in her work before (don’t get me wrong, she’s had some very emotional topics), and I think she did it respectfully and showed the effect it can have.  It also brought tears to my eyes, but I guess it really wouldn’t be a Sarah Dessen book if I didn’t cry!

The meet cute for Louna and Ambrose is pretty adorable as she has to literally grab him and drag him to his own  mother’s wedding.  This is just a sneak peek of the shenanigans that Ambrose does throughout the whole novel.  In all honesty, he’s probably my favorite male character/love interest that Dessen has written since Dexter in This Lullaby.  Ambrose is witty, clumsy, laid back, and anxious at the same time.  He is fabulous. I do love how Dessen is able to show the reader, through Louna’s point of view, how much he cares for her…without Louna actually realizing it throughout the majority of the novel. It’s awesome.

Also, the secondary characters of Louna’s mom and her business partner are so well rounded in this novel too.  I think the main issue I have with some contemporary novels is that only the main couple characters will be fully fleshed out, but Dessen doesn’t do this in Once and For All.  They made me laugh out loud multiple times.

Keep an eye out for this one, out next week June 6.  You definitely don’t want to miss this.

5 Bards.

Discovering Dessen: A Brief Essay

There was this old used book store about five minutes from where I grew up that my Mom and Mawmaw used to take me to.  Now, when I say “take me to,” it wasn’t necessarily for my own enjoyment. Although I did fall in love with a good murder mystery there, and it’s where I found my first copy of Agatha Christie’s And Then There Were None.

The store was built out of what looked like singed wood from a moldy forest, and it smelled like moth balls inside.  The majority of the store was filled with old Harlequin romance novels, the same thing that my Mawmaw always read.  You know the type; the covers were always a beefcake with no shirt and a scantily clad woman in what looked like ripped lingerie.  Either way, she’d wander her way through the stacks, and I’d just play hide and seek with an invisible friend while I was in my early years, and then would just strut around bored in my early teens.  

Until one day when I discovered a new shelf.  It was small, maybe twelve books that were for middle grade or young adults.  Granted, I can honestly say that the shelf wasn’t necessarily labeled, not that I remember, at least, but that the covers weren’t so risqué.  The covers were either illustrated or were of inanimate objects to indicate some sort of theme in the novel.  However, the book that caught my eye was a lonely pier jutting out into a beautiful blue body of water, and it had a solitary human image.  Naturally this was the book I picked up and begged my Mawmaw to buy for me for the $1.25 that the store was asking for. (I feel like it’s needless to say at this point that the store is no longer open, as their prices weren’t exactly sustainable.)

This book was Dreamland by Sarah Dessen.

Honestly, I don’t remember exactly what impact this book made on me, or if it was one of my favorite reads at the time, but her name stuck with me. I liked Dessen’s novel enough to remember to look for her name in the bookstore.  It wasn’t long before I had devoured her other three novels, That Summer, Keeping the Moon, and Someone like You. During this time I was playing on a traveling softball team on the weekends, so we would end up in the car for a few hours driving to and from fields, and we would also have an hour or two to kill between games…so I would read.

No other book that I can remember stuck out to me more than Dessen’s next novel This Lullaby.  This was the book that I found by chance in the bookstore when we were at the beach for a softball tournament as this was way before I got into book blogging or even knew what day new books were released.  We were just killing time, hitting up the food court for lunch, and wandering in and out of stores. Even then I was known as a bit of a book nerd, since I was the one who always had a novel on hand and a book suggestion on the tip of my tongue.  So it was no surprise that I practically demanded to go into the bookstore.  

At this point, I don’t remember if there was a specific young adult book shelf like there is now, or rather, a whole section, but I remember seeing Dessen’s name and immediately grabbing the hardcover off the shelf. This novel quickly became one of my all-time favorite books, and that hasn’t changed 15 years later.
Remy’s extreme negative attitude toward relationships and love spoke to me on so many levels.  As a teenager, I was extremely jaded already, because this character made me feel like I was reading my own thoughts.  Not only was Remy an amazingly relatable character, but Dexter quickly became my first book boyfriend (Huzzah!).

My first copy of This Lullaby eventually fell apart from me carrying it in my bat bag, my friends’ borrowing it, and from reading it over and over. I went to the store to pick up a new copy, paperback, this time, and found The Truth About Forever.

I cannot credit anyone with my love of young adult literature more than I can credit Sarah Dessen.  

When I was a teenager struggling with first love, my eating disorder, deaths in the family, etc, her novels spoke to me on a level I didn’t realize books could.

Two years ago I finally had the chance to meet Sarah in person for the first time, and it was like meeting a lifelong hero for me.  I was 28, but I may as well have been 13 again, because all those emotions of reading Dreamland and This Lullaby came back.  It was one of the highlights of being a book blogger and reader, so the release of Dessen’s thirteenth novel reminds me that I’ve been reading her novels since I WAS thirteen.  It’s serendipitous, in a way, because Once and For All takes me back to all of the feelings I had about This Lullaby more than any of her others.

Louna and Ambrose will sit in my mind just as much as Remy and Dexter, Macy and Wes, Auden and Eli, and so many more Dessen characters.

So I have to throw out a thank you to Sarah Dessen for being there for me since I was 13 and for being a go-to read for me for seventeen years. That’s crazy! Seventeen (which is fewer than the number of times I’ve read This Lullaby. Not a lie.)

Once and For All comes out on June 6, 2017 and it is not a book to be missed.

NOLA Review: Between Two Skies by Joanne O’Sullivan



Bayou Perdu, a tiny fishing town way, way down in Louisiana, is home to sixteen-year-old Evangeline Riley. She has her best friends, Kendra and Danielle; her wise, beloved Mamere; and back-to-back titles in the under-sixteen fishing rodeo. But, dearest to her heart, she has the peace that only comes when she takes her skiff out to where there is nothing but sky and air and water and wings. It’s a small life, but it is Evangeline’s. And then the storm comes, and everything changes. Amid the chaos and pain and destruction comes Tru — a fellow refugee, a budding bluesman, a balm for Evangeline’s aching heart. Told in a strong, steady voice, with a keen sense of place and a vivid cast of characters, here is a novel that asks compelling questions about class and politics, exile and belonging, and the pain of being cast out of your home. But above all, this remarkable debut tells a gently woven love story, difficult to put down, impossible to forget.

This week is focused on the City of New Orleans. A caveat of this novel specifically is that it’s actually set in a smaller parish outside of New Orleans, but it deals with some characters from NOLA and the implications of evacuation pre and post-Katrina.  I figured that counts towards it!

Between Two Skies is beautifully simplistic and heart wrenching at the same time. Don’t mistake simplistic for poorly written, it is just easy to read considering the subject matter. The narrative follows the Riley family as they navigate the times before Katrina – where they struggled to stay afloat financially, to post-Katrina where they struggle with their lives after the devastation and with the idea of returning home.

Home is such an important aspect of this novel.  While some narratives really emphasize that home is where the heart is in a family or romantic sense, Evangeline feels this on such a basic and physical level of being connected to the land and the water of the Mississippi and the Gulf. She’s a champion fisher, although I really don’t know what kind of competitions there are for fishing other than maybe the size of the catch? I’ve only fished like twice in my life though, so that’s probably why I have very little knowledge of this. But anyway, being a fisherwoman would help explain why she felt so connected to the water and the land around her town.

O’Sullivan touches on the depression and anxiety that came from the relocation of the Riley’s to Atlanta, and how adjusting to a completely new school without any roots, any of their major belongings, or their friends. This is mostly shown through Evangeline’s sister, Mandy, so it really is just touched on.  I do think this should have been more of a focus, but I understand that it wasn’t the main point of this story.

I do think the love story was a bit distracting from the family narrative that I found to be the best part of the book, and the death of the family matriarch should have been more important and a focus on the transition to the new generation.

Other than those drawbacks, I really enjoyed reading this book! I read it in one sitting, and I suggest everyone pick up a copy!

4 Bards.

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