Book Review: Goodbye Days by Jeff Zentner

Can a text message destroy your life?

Carver Briggs never thought a simple text would cause a fatal crash, killing his three best friends, Mars, Eli, and Blake. Now Carver can’t stop blaming himself for the accident and even worse, there could be a criminal investigation into the deaths.

Then Blake’s grandmother asks Carver to remember her grandson with a ‘goodbye day’ together. Carver has his misgivings, but he starts to help the families of his lost friends grieve with their own memorial days, along with Eli’s bereaved girlfriend Jesmyn. But not everyone is willing to forgive. Carver’s own despair and guilt threatens to pull him under into panic and anxiety as he faces punishment for his terrible mistake. Can the goodbye days really help?

Hooo boy, this was a lot heavier than I was expecting. Not even touching on the themes of culpability and guilt, anyone that has lost a friend as a teenager can relate to Carver’s grief. His grief, that comes in waves, where sometimes you forget for just a moment, is so real that it makes reading this book and relating to him so easy.

The idea of goodbye days was a perfect way to showcase that everyone grieves differently and different people need different methods and more/less time to process their grief. And some people need someone to blame. There’s a lot of nuance to the whole situation, and Zentner writes it beautifully. As much as I feel for Carver, I can also perfectly understand the reactions of Mars’ father and Eli’s sister (and even Eli’s parents). The goodbye days that Carver spends with each of them showcase each of those different reactions. Even though Carver does have to deal with his own grief and feelings of guilt, I think those days are good for him (and the reader) to sit with others’ grief and not just his own, even though it’s hard for him.

I think my favorite part of this book, though, was the focus on mental health and wellness. Carver is determined to deal with this on his own, with only his sister as his support system. But when he has a panic attack out of nowhere (as they usually happen), Georgia starts to insist that he needs more help than she can give him. After a second panic attack at school, he agrees to go see someone. As Carver makes his way through therapy and dealing with his guilt and his grief, we get a clear picture of how therapy works, and it’s not always pretty and perfect. Sometimes it’s hard and sometimes you don’t see the point. It was such a refreshing portrayal of therapy

(I was glad to see the references to The Serpent King. Good to know that Dearly is doing well for himself, though the song for his friend definitely turned on the waterworks, so thanks for that, Jeff.)

This book was heartbreaking and beautiful in the best ways, be sure to grab the tissues. 4.5 bards.

Book Review: Sad Perfect by Stephanie Elliot


The story of a teen girl’s struggle with Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder and how love helps her on the road to recovery.

Sixteen-year-old Pea looks normal, but she has a secret: she has Avoidant/Restrictive Food Intake Disorder (ARFID). It is like having a monster inside of her, one that not only dictates what she can eat, but also causes anxiety, depression, and thoughts that she doesn’t want to have. When she falls crazy-mad in love with Ben, she hides her disorder from him, pretending that she’s fine. At first, everything really does feel like it’s getting better with him around, so she stops taking her anxiety and depression medication. And that’s when the monster really takes over her life. Just as everything seems lost and hopeless, Pea finds in her family, and in Ben, the support and strength she needs to learn that her eating disorder doesn’t have to control her.

Release Date: February 28, 2017

A couple disclaimers before I get started. Jessica originally agreed to write an honest review of this book in exchange for an advanced copy. As someone in recovery for ED, she jumped on the chance to review a new book with positive representation, especially about a relatively unknown ED. However, before she received the book she read this anonymous review by another ED survivor. We talked about it and decided it might be too triggering for her to read it, so we had the book sent to me instead. Full disclosure, I do not have an eating disorder but I am familiar with Jess’s story and one of my best friends from high school almost died because of her struggle with her ED.

Okay, so I slept on it before writing this review and I’m still angry but I’ll try to keep the yelling out. First things first, I am not a fan of second person narration. While overall it was a quick read, it was irritating trying to get through it. Second, Pea spends this entire book putting down other girls, and even gets this idea reinforced from her boyfriend who says, “Maybe that’s what I expect girls to do, pick girlie colors, but you’re different,” and, later on, the quintessential quote, “You’re not like other girls.” Excuse me while I go scream for eternity that THERE’S NOTHING WRONG WITH OTHER GIRLS.

And that’s just what I thought was disappointing about this book. But Sad Perfect is more than just disappointing, it’s damaging on so many levels. When Pea first gets her diagnosis of ARFID she immediately starts one on one and group sessions of therapy. There’s not much focus on either of these things as part of her recovery. The things we do see of group therapy are her continued thoughts of otherness. She repeatedly mentions that her ED is different than the other girls (only girls, because obviously only white girls can have ED) and therefore somehow worse. This opinion does not change by the end of the book.

While she does continue therapy throughout the book, it seems that the only real help she gets is from her boyfriend whom she met in the very first chapter. She decides that he helps her so much that she stops taking her anti-depressants. So when they get into a fight, she starts self harming with a safety pin (way to glorify that by putting it on the cover of the book, btw). While self-harm can coexist with ED and other mental illnesses, her self-harm was literally a plot device to get her admitted to a hospital on suicide watch, where Elliot vilifies almost all hospital staff and makes gross stereotypes of the people that “need” to be there.

Pea’s stay in the hospital was her catalyst for wanting to get better and taking responsibility for her “monster.” She talks at length about how she created this monster and that really the monster is her and that her ED is her fault. She then goes on to say that she doesn’t deserve to be in the hospital when she has her family and Ben (who she has known for approximately 10 seconds) who love her. But these stereotypically low-income people need to be in the hospital because they don’t have anyone who loves them. There were multiple times that I wanted to throw this book, but during her whole hospital stay I had to physically restrain myself from actually doing so.

At the end of the book, we’re left with the message that Pea is still different from everyone else and that the power of a boy loving you will make you want to get better. I understand that Elliot’s daughter suffers from ARFID and she wanted to shed light on what her daughter and her family went through. However, it’s glaringly obvious that she has no knowledge whatsoever about any other ED and doesn’t care to.

For a better look at ED, check out Jessica’s review of Elena, Vanishing. And for more information about eating disorders and treatment visit the National Eating Disorder Association.

If I could give this zero bards, I would, but I guess I’ll settle for one.

Book Review: Wayfarer by Alexandra Bracken

All Etta Spencer wanted was to make her violin debut when she was thrust into a treacherous world where the struggle for power could alter history. After losing the one thing that would have allowed her to protect the Timeline, and the one person worth fighting for, Etta awakens alone in an unknown place and time, exposed to the threat of the two groups who would rather see her dead than succeed. When help arrives, it comes from the last person Etta ever expected—Julian Ironwood, the Grand Master’s heir who has long been presumed dead, and whose dangerous alliance with a man from Etta’s past could put them both at risk.

Meanwhile, Nicholas and Sophia are racing through time in order to locate Etta and the missing astrolabe with Ironwood travelers hot on their trail. They cross paths with a mercenary-for-hire, a cheeky girl named Li Min who quickly develops a flirtation with Sophia. But as the three of them attempt to evade their pursuers, Nicholas soon realizes that one of his companions may have ulterior motives.

As Etta and Nicholas fight to make their way back to one another, from Imperial Russia to the Vatican catacombs, time is rapidly shifting and changing into something unrecognizable… and might just run out on both of them.

Holy. Cow.

Let me start by saying, that I love time travel. However, time travel gives me a headache because it makes me think too much and ask too many questions. That being said, that only happened like three times over the course of these two books. This sequel is incredible. There’s always so much that’s going on but it never feels like too much. And at the same time, it’s at a pace where you can grasp how the mechanics of traveling work, without questioning it too much because you’re too invested in what’s going to happen next.

I was lucky enough to meet Alex Bracken (and Susan Dennard) on the WayWitch tour, and something that Alex said about how she constructs her characters really stuck out to me, “what about your world has caused you to be this way?” She does an excellent job of portraying that on the page, and for me, the biggest example of that is Nicholas. Not only in his motivations for independence and freedom from the Ironwoods, but in how Etta, and later Sophia and Julian, see him and how the recognize their privilege (the word privilege is actually used multiple times and it’s glorious).

I was so excited to get more of Sophia’s story in this book. Honestly, I loved her in the first one, even though she was always getting in the way. To me, it definitely always felt like there was more to her, and I am so so so glad that Bracken decided to expand on her character. And I’m even MORE glad that she explicitly says that she prefers women and always has. Nicholas’s response was also amazing. I love that they grudgingly come to rely on each other and even care about each other. Their journey and friendship is one of my favorite parts of the book.

In a book about time travel with ruthless people taking the idea of “the ends justify the means” a little too far, for me, this book was more about family. Every single character is on a journey that connects them with family, whether it is blood or found. But at the same time, it shows that family is messy and not perfect and sometimes you have to confront the fact that your parents can make mistakes.

I could talk about this book all day, honestly, I loved it a lot, 4.5 bards.

#ReadIndie Book Review: The Foxhole Court by Nora Sakavic

Neil Josten is the newest addition to the Palmetto State University Exy team. He’s short, he’s fast, he’s got a ton of potential—and he’s the runaway son of the murderous crime lord known as The Butcher.

Signing a contract with the PSU Foxes is the last thing a guy like Neil should do. The team is high profile and he doesn’t need sports crews broadcasting pictures of his face around the nation. His lies will hold up only so long under this kind of scrutiny and the truth will get him killed.

But Neil’s not the only one with secrets on the team. One of Neil’s new teammates is a friend from his old life, and Neil can’t walk away from him a second time. Neil has survived the last eight years by running. Maybe he’s finally found someone and something worth fighting for.

This is going to be a little different as a review because this is the third time I’ve read this trilogy this year (if that tells you anything about my opinion), and I’ve also read all of the extra content available on Sakavic’s tumblr. After finishing the series, you can definitely see how Sakavic sets up for the final book and where the story is going to go. However, the first time I read it I had no idea where it was going, so if that happens to you, I encourage you to keep going. Especially, since this is a book about a demisexual character written by an aro/ace author. It was probably the first book I ever read about someone on the ace spectrum, so it’s definitely worth it to keep going.

The book starts out about a kid on the run from his father just trying to find some kind of happiness in playing a sport he loves. As it turns out, Neil’s running from more than just his father, he just didn’t know it. The story does get pretty dark and graphic as Neil’s complicated past catches up with him. What I love about Neil though is that he is a survivor. No matter what is thrown at him he continues to get back up and keep living, sometimes out of pure spite (which is definitely something I can relate to).

I do love every single character (that’s not trying to kill Neil) in this series. They’re all flawed and complicated and it makes them more real. But they’re also sarcastic little shits that make you shake your head and laugh in disbelief. Wymack is the perfect example of all bark and no bite when it comes to his team, he yells at them day in and day out, but would lay down his life for any one of them. Andrew becomes the steadying force in Neil’s life if only because he’s been through just as much as Neil and Neil comes to learn that relying on Andrew could be the easiest thing he’s ever done. The rest of the Foxes stick with Neil even through all the crazy drama he brings with him. They make him believe he can have nice things (if he doesn’t up his big mouth and call his biggest rival an asshole on National TV) and a home with them.

At the end of the day The Foxhole Court is a story about home and finding a family, and sticking around on a chance of hope, even when you don’t think you deserve it. That’s why this story resonates so much with me, why I’ve read it three times this year. The struggle to find a balance between what you’ve known your whole life and what you desperately want instead is something I think a lot of people can relate to.

I’d give the trilogy an overall 4.5 bards.

A Torch Against the Night by Sabaa Tahir

25558608Elias and Laia are running for their lives. After the events of the Fourth Trial, Martial soldiers hunt the two fugitives as they flee the city of Serra and undertake a perilous journey through the heart of the Empire.

Laia is determined to break into Kauf—the Empire’s most secure and dangerous prison—to save her brother, who is the key to the Scholars’ survival. And Elias is determined to help Laia succeed, even if it means giving up his last chance at freedom.

But dark forces, human and otherworldly, work against Laia and Elias. The pair must fight every step of the way to outsmart their enemies: the bloodthirsty Emperor Marcus, the merciless Commandant, the sadistic Warden of Kauf, and, most heartbreaking of all, Helene—Elias’s former friend and the Empire’s newest Blood Shrike.

Bound to Marcus’s will, Helene faces a torturous mission of her own—one that might destroy her: find the traitor Elias Veturius and the Scholar slave who helped him escape…and kill them both.

I love that Laia is coming more into herself and gaining more and more confidence now that she’s no longer under the Commandant’s control. I think her relationship with Elias has a lot to do with that, and I can definitely appreciate that. When he leaves to go be all noble and save her brother before he dies, and she’s left with Keenan, we can still feel her missing him and she starts to realize that she was becoming the girl she was meant to be with him; he helps her feel strong. I just don’t feel that connection with Keenan. Logically, I know they spend a lot of time alone together after Elias leaves, but most of their “bonding” we don’t see, so I don’t feel it.

I liked Elias a lot more in this one than the first one. I wanted to like him in Ember but his total idiocy with Helene made me angry. So, I’m definitely not as annoyed by him. The fact that he’s slowly dying ramps up the angst factor, and because I’m predictable, I love it. While I wish there was still more about the Augurs, I liked that we’re getting to know the fey and the Nightbringer through Elias and his trips to the Waiting Place.

I think I love Helene’s struggle the most. Always the devoted friend, and certainly one of the most faithful to the Augurs and their system, she’s definitely learning what it means to believe in them and what sacrifices she will have to make. Her internal struggle with her belief in the Augurs and whether or not she should save Elias, even if it means her family’s lives is written so well. I never know what she’s going to do or she’s going to react and I think that makes her a wonderful character to read.

The story itself is excellent, enough magic and intrigue to keep you guessing, but also non-stop action picking up right where Ember left off. There are a couple slow parts throughout the book, and there are times when it jumps too fast from one time to the next. It seems like it’s still trying to find a good rhythm.

Overall, four bards.
fourbards

Guest Book Review: The Miseducation of Cameron Post by Emily M. Danforth

 

cas-and-les

Lesley (left) and Cassie (Right)

As you know, many of my best friends are helping out Team Midsummer with our LGBT History Month Celebration, and today’s Guest Book Review is by Lesley!  Lesley and Jess met at church a few years back, enjoyed many a trivia night together, and are now part of the fabulous five best friend group.  Lesley is now married to Cassie (another one of our Guest Reviewers!) and they are the most adorable of the adorable.

 

11595276When Cameron Post’s parents die suddenly in a car crash, her shocking first thought is relief. Relief they’ll never know that, hours earlier, she had been kissing a girl.

But that relief doesn’t last, and Cam is soon forced to move in with her conservative aunt Ruth and her well-intentioned but hopelessly old-fashioned grandmother. She knows that from this point on, her life will forever be different. Survival in Miles City, Montana, means blending in and leaving well enough alone (as her grandmother might say), and Cam becomes an expert at both.

Then Coley Taylor moves to town. Beautiful, pickup-driving Coley is a perfect cowgirl with the perfect boyfriend to match. She and Cam forge an unexpected and intense friendship — one that seems to leave room for something more to emerge. But just as that starts to seem like a real possibility, ultrareligious Aunt Ruth takes drastic action to ‘fix’ her niece, bringing Cam face-to-face with the cost of denying her true self — even if she’s not exactly sure who that is.

I grew up in a very small farming community in rural Michigan.  My parents were evangelical Christians and most of my friends and their families were, in some form, Christian too.  I was a “jock girl”, very tall, athletic, slightly arrogant and underneath it all, very gay.  Given this information, it would seem obvious to anyone reading the notes about The Miseducation of Cameron Post to see why I might have identified with Emily M. Danforth’s plucky main character.

However, Cam’s tomboy antics, Jesus-loving friends and family and pension for lady love aren’t the only things that make her relatable.  In fact, most of us can identify with Cam’s struggle for acceptance and identity regardless of our experiences or sexual orientation.  In The Miseducation of Cameron Post, we follow Cam on a journey from ages twelve to seventeen as she looks for her true self in her relationships, struggles and daily life.  She seeks acceptance from friends, lovers and the adults in her life the way any child would.  In the end Cameron finds the most satisfaction in accepting herself and in starting a life that reflects her beliefs and choices.

After a youthful crush and sugar-sweet first kiss, Cam experiences a devastating loss.  Forced to navigate her formative years with only her born-again aunt and elderly grandma to guide her, Cam gets into the usual trouble created by the boredom of teens in small town America.  Her trouble is often overlooked until her greatest secret is twisted from the truth and revealed as a dark path from which she must be saved.   Instead of finishing out high school, Cam is sent to a rehabilitation school for kids with similar “afflictions”.

This book is one that tells the story of each of us as we grow in a world that prefers the status quo.  While the subject matter is a bit dark, the depth of Danforth’s characters creates a light and lovely story.  It reminds us to celebrate our differences and that a diverse world is a beautiful one.

I absolutely recommend this book for anyone struggling with self-acceptance for any reason.

4 Bards, as I liked the book, but the ending left me hanging, which I didn’t really like.

fourbards

Book Review: An Ember in the Ashes by Sabaa Tahir

27774758Laia is a slave. Elias is a soldier. Neither is free.

Under the Martial Empire, defiance is met with death. Those who do not vow their blood and bodies to the Emperor risk the execution of their loved ones and the destruction of all they hold dear.

It is in this brutal world, inspired by ancient Rome, that Laia lives with her grandparents and older brother. The family ekes out an existence in the Empire’s impoverished backstreets. They do not challenge the Empire. They’ve seen what happens to those who do.

But when Laia’s brother is arrested for treason, Laia is forced to make a decision. In exchange for help from rebels who promise to rescue her brother, she will risk her life to spy for them from within the Empire’s greatest military academy.

There, Laia meets Elias, the school’s finest soldier—and secretly, its most unwilling. Elias wants only to be free of the tyranny he’s being trained to enforce. He and Laia will soon realize that their destinies are intertwined—and that their choices will change the fate of the Empire itself.

Some thoughts I texted to Jess while reading:

  1. Oh no my best friends in love with me. Are all girls like this?
  2. Why are they so confusing I can’t handle basic human emotions and I just generalize all girls because she’s the only one I know
  3. I liked it at first because she wasn’t in love with him. She was annoyed when he stared at her and told him to get his life together
  4. So not only is his best friend a girl and in love with him, he finally meets the other main character and they fall in love instantly blah blah blah
    I mean, they’re not together, but they had that instant eyes meeting let’s stare at each other for minutes on end like nothing else mattered before now
  5. “I shout at her now because I’m so angry at her for loving me”
    This is an actual sentence that I just had to read with my own two eyes
    “If she had controlled her emotions we never would have fought”
    Aaaaaaand it got worse
  6. I want to like Elias, I really do, but he’s so [damn] stupid that I want to shove him off a cliff.
    And we’ve gotten to the part where the best friend hates being in love him. Of course.
  7. Honestly, if this book were only Elias, I wouldn’t keep reading. I like Laia’s story so far. Even if she can’t help loving Elias because that’s what you do in a YA novel.
  8. It is strange though that they both have other love interests. It’s a love square instead of a triangle.
    I mean, there’s not much to know about Keenan so far. Other than he’s with the resistance. And her father saved his life. At least he’s not an idiot like Elias.
  9. And now, Elias and Helene have to fight each other to the death. That’s one way to get rid of a love interest.
    So. He didn’t kill his best friend. But they literally gave him Laia as a prize for winning.
    Gross.

Now for a semi-real review:

This book mentions rape as a punishment for women, almost every other chapter. Not only mentions but characters are actively threatening (and almost succeeding) to rape other characters. And I am just… so tired. I need for all authors to do better.

I almost didn’t finish this book, but I have hope for the next one. Because the story is interesting and I want to know what happens. The idea of the augurs basically overthrowing the current emperor to host the trials for a new one is pretty interesting. The weird family dynamic of Gens Veturius is intriguing. Plus the drama within the resistance and how Laia and her family are connected and the betrayal that got her parents killed. I’m waiting every other chapter to see if it’s finally revealed. I’m always expecting anyone she talks to to slip up and give a hint that they were part of the reason her family was killed.

As annoyed as I was at some parts of the book, I’m excited to read the next one, and I’d give this one 3.5 bards.

3.5bards

 

 

 


Book Review: Ruin and Rising by Leigh Bardugo

14061957The Darkling rules Ravka from his shadow throne.

Now the nation’s fate rests with a broken Sun Summoner, a disgraced tracker, and the shattered remnants of a once-great magical army.

Alina will have to forge new alliances and put aside old rivalries as she and Mal race to find the last of Morozova’s amplifiers. But as she begins to unravel the Darkling’s secrets, she reveals a past that will forever alter her understanding of the bond they share and the power she wields. The firebird is the one thing that stands between Ravka and destruction—and claiming it could cost Alina the very future she’s fighting for.

I spent three books thinking Mal was gonna be the worst thing ever and I just didn’t see it at all? Maybe because I was expecting the worst, but I think Alina could have done a lot worse. Like the Darkling, for instance. And I get that that seems to be an unpopular opinion in the fandom, but here’s the thing, the relationship that Alina has with the Darkling reminds me so much of Buffy and Spike in Season 6 that I just cannot get behind it.

Every private interaction she has with the Darkling he talks about how she could “balance” him and make him a better man, and both times her response is that he wouldn’t do the same for her. She wants him, but she doesn’t want to want him, and that I think is the most important thing about Alina. She takes to power well, she’s a natural leader, but she doesn’t want to be a monster.

The Darkling is a terrible person. He has no qualms about using/killing people to get what he wants. Those rare moments of humanity we see in him are only brought out by Alina. He’s relying on her to be his gatekeeper, and honestly, I’m not here for that. But I also think that’s what makes readers love him so much. Bardugo does an amazing job of making this character, who should be totally unlikeable (he is the antagonist, after all), not just likable, but somehow relatable.

I don’t have super strong feelings on Mal one way or the other. I think the fact that he was important to Alina made him important to the story, but also that she didn’t necessarily need him. I will say that the best part about Mal is that he recognizes that. Like I’ve said, I kept waiting for him to screw up so badly that I would hate his guts and that never happened. Instead, I was always surprised by how much he cared about Alina to stop being so selfish and step aside for her be as powerful as she was meant to be.

I am not ruined. I am ruination.

Genya’s storyline has to be my favorite. “I hope the taste of me was worth it.” Just. Damn. That whole interaction with the King (and Nikolai!!! bringing his own father to justice!!!!! I just love him a lot, okay?) was one of the best parts of the series for me. I’m glad that she was able to come back from that and I’m glad that she stopped hiding herself after what the Darkling did to her face and I’m also glad for David and that he finally had some good words for Genya rather than just talking about science. (I’m never getting over this scene, sorry, not sorry.)

Nikolai continues to be the best thing ever. I love how just completely dramatic he is, but it’s not obnoxious, it’s just who he is. Bringing honesty and candor and just overall lightness to everything. I don’t have anything else to add. Except that I wish he were real.

I did like the ending, though I think it may have been more impactful if it had gone the other way. Overall, I loved the series, I read all 3 in 3 days. They were so easy to get into and they kept me on the edge the whole time I was reading. That being said, I don’t know if I would have loved them as much if I had read them before Six of Crows so I’m glad I read that first. 4 bards for the conclusion of this wild ride.

fourbards

 

 

 


Book Review: Siege and Storm by Leigh Bardugo

14061955Darkness never dies.

Hunted across the True Sea, haunted by the lives she took on the Fold, Alina must try to make a life with Mal in an unfamiliar land. She finds starting new is not easy while keeping her identity as the Sun Summoner a secret. She can’t outrun her past or her destiny for long.

The Darkling has emerged from the Shadow Fold with a terrifying new power and a dangerous plan that will test the very boundaries of the natural world. With the help of a notorious privateer, Alina returns to the country she abandoned, determined to fight the forces gathering against Ravka. But as her power grows, Alina slips deeper into the Darkling’s game of forbidden magic, and farther away from Mal. Somehow, she will have to choose between her country, her power, and the love she always thought would guide her–or risk losing everything to the oncoming storm.

So this book picks up with Mal and Alina living on the run and I thought that it would be a little slow at the beginning because of it. But the Darkling shows up almost immediately. I have to say I’m really glad that it’s pointed out that they were not really that smart about hiding their tracks. I mean, obviously these kids have never had to hide before so it makes sense that they wouldn’t really know how and that they would be caught very soon.

Nikolai is literally the best. He’s honestly just so refreshing. Everything is always so doom and gloom (don’t get me wrong, I love it, please give me all the angsty, gloomy stories always) and just by virtue of being himself, Nikolai brings light to the whole story without detracting from it. I love that Alina is building relationships with him, and Tolya and Tamar, and just people other than Mal or the Darkling. Having an actual support system is A+++.

It’s interesting to see how Alina is struggling with her power. And not just her power but also herself. Like calls to like, as everyone keeps saying throughout the books. She and the Darkling are so similar. The biggest difference is in their choices. While the Darkling chose to embrace his own darkness (obviously, I mean, the man gave up his name to be the Darkling, how emo can you be), Alina, though, struggles with embracing her darkness and I’m reminded of one of my favorite Harry Potter quotes.

“It is our choices, Harry, that show what we truly are, far more than our abilities.”

Alina’s choices are the things that set her apart so definitively from the Darkling. No matter the pull she feels towards him, she chooses to embrace the light and embrace the people that care about her.

“Does the bird feel the weight of its wings?”

Bardugo always has the amazing ability to make one line stick out to me the most in every one of her books. The thing that sets you free is not always easy. Every choice Alina makes weighs heavily on her. Like all “chosen ones” in YA fiction Alina has literally had the weight of the world thrust upon her and with each new amplifier she gets stronger and more in control, but the weight of the world and her responsibilities also gets heavier.

I can’t wait for the conclusion, I’d give this one 4 bards.
fourbards

 

 

 

 


Waiting on Wednesday

waiting on wednesday

Every week Breaking the Spine hosts the bookish meme for book bloggers to share what books they are waiting on to be released!  This week I’m waiting on:

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Release Date: December 13, 2016

MAGNUS and CLEO are forced to test the strength of their love when Gaius returns to Mytica claiming he’s no longer the King of Blood but a changed man seeking redemption.

LUCIA, pregnant with the child of a Watcher, has escaped the clutches of the unhinged fire god. Her powers are dwindling as she goes forth to fulfill a prophecy that will keep her baby safe . . . but could mean her demise.

JONAS treks back to Mytica with a plan to overtake Amara, but fate takes hold when he runs into the beautiful Princess Lucia and joins her on her perilous journey.

AMARA has taken the Mytican throne, but with no way to unleash the water magic trapped within her stolen crystal, she’ll never be able to seize glory and get sweet revenge.

And what kind of darkness will descend–and who will be safe–after Prince Ashur reveals the dangerous price he paid to cheat death?

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